Conformity In Group Setting

1023 Words 5 Pages
For many centuries, social psychologists have examined factors that influence human behaviors; specifically, they have tried to understand why individuals would change their behaviors depending on the context they are in. A popular topic that has been studied heavily on by social psychologist is how social influence has an impact on changing people’s behaviors. Experts in the field have identified theories such as conformity, bystander effect, social comparison, and group polarization to explain why “People don’t behave the same way in a group as they do when they’re alone.” Being in a group setting not only can influence one’s behaviors, but also their decisions and attitude. However, people do not necessarily behave differently every single …show more content…
Regardless of how clear the correct answer was (as cited in Reis, 2010, p. 37). However, in the alone setting, participants’ wrong response was highly reduced. The results of Asch’s experiment showed that in group setting, people tend to have the pressure to confirm to the groups no matter how irrational the group is behaving. Although some participants showed conformity, one quarter of the participants were “completely independent and never agreed with the erroneous judgments” (p. 33). Therefore, not everyone will behave different in a group setting compare to a group setting. Personality traits can help to explain why someone would change their behaviors under group setting while others would not. For example, someone who is high in agreeableness from the Five Factor Model (FFM) is more likely to conform to the group’s decision. Furthermore, culture can also influence whether someone would conform more easily than others. For example, people from collectivistic cultures are more likely to conform than individualist cultures because in collectivistic cultures, people are more likely to go along with the group. In contrast, people from individualistic cultures tend to favor uniqueness, so they are less likely to …show more content…
Darley and Latne (1968) conducted a study and found that participants were more likely to offer help to the confederate who was feigning a seizure when they were alone than in a group setting (as cited in McCullough & Tabak, 2010, p. 285). One possible explanation is that people tend to look for other people around them for cues to judge whether the situation is emergency (McCullough & Tabak, 2010). According to the social validation theory, “people frequently use the beliefs, attitudes, and actions of others, particularly similar others, as a standard of comparison against which to evaluate the correctness of their own beliefs, attitudes, and actions” ( Cialdini & Griskevicius, 2010, p. 392). People tend to look at other people in evaluating their own beliefs, attitude, or action. This is similar to the social comparison theory where people “have a constant drive to evaluate themselves” and use the social cues to validate their beliefs, actions, or attitude (Cialdini & Griskevicius, 2010, p. 392). Both theories imply that people in groups might behave differently than in alone setting because of the social cues that are influencing their judgements and attitudes. Unlike in alone setting, people do not have any social cues to validate their judgements; therefore, they act according to

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