The Importance Of Moral Values In The United States

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I argue that the United States fails to encompass moral values by supporting anti-democratic ideals so that they can increase their militaristic presence and protect economic interests in the world. Since the last century, the U.S has used the power of evil governments to slightly expand the presence of their military and ensure the safety of commercial interests. From Cuba in the early 20th century to numerous Middle Eastern countries in the 21st century, the case has been evident that the U.S. will overlook various human rights violations just for an additional military base or for the profits of a company. The claim is made that the United States should look out for itself and act in ways that improve the American society. The U.S. has lost …show more content…
In the mid-20th century, following World War two the U.S. had looked like it was going to have a revival of moral values in its foreign policy. As an example, the country had just defeated one of the biggest threats to Europe, as they defeated the Nazis. They had stopped catastrophes such as the killing of millions of Jews and stopped the Japanese from killing millions of Chinese and Koreans. Also, the Marshall plan was helping people in Europe and making sure they can get their life back on track. The country had set up a true democracy in West Germany and thinks looked bright, but things took a sharp turn as Communism began to spread. With a different form of government that looked intimidating and scary, the U.S. was going to make sure it could not spread around the world. That meant increased militarization and newly imposed dictators that would suppress any kind of socialistic views. For example, many of the Latin countries the U.S. was involved in the earlier part of the century began to have policies that the U.S. did not support. So, in response conflicts resulted that cost numerous people their lives. One of the greatest examples deals with the country of Guatemala. In the 1940’s and 50’s, the country of Guatemala had embraced new social reforms such as a minimum wage law, increased education funding, and almost universal suffrage. The …show more content…
The Middle East is such a vital area to the United States because of the oil interests of the area, and also due to the fact it harbors many terrorist groups that pose risks to the country. In the mid-1980’s, a war had erupted between Iraq and Iran. The United States was supporting Iraq and its leader Saddam Hussein. Hussein was an absolute awful tyrant, but the U.S. viewed him as an ally especially against Iran. Iran had a revolution, a decade prior and they had ousted a leader who was supported by the United States. The war costs at least both sides 100,000 deaths and tightened the grip of Saddam’s power in Iraq. Saddam after the war would massacre hundreds of thousands of people in his own country. This genocide was not troubling enough for the U.S. to act militarily. Then in the early 1990’s Iraq invaded oil-enriched Kuwait and this compelled the U.S. to show its military power. The U.S. with various other countries swept and quickly stopped all Iraqi forces in Kuwait. What occurred after this war was the U.S.’s permanent residence in the Middle East. The U.S. would construct various military bases in several countries such as Saudi Arabia and Bahrain. What is unusual is that the U.S. operates in these countries, even though they share the same ideals as the enemies they are fighting. The main difference is that they are not doing anything that is bad enough to cause the U.S. to back

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