The Latino Community Analysis

1593 Words 6 Pages
The United States is a country made up of countless ethnicities and nationalities from different parts of the world that have different cultural beliefs, traditions and customs. The rich culture of the U.S. mainly stems from immigrants, individuals who have migrated from another country. With any change there is struggle, especially when it comes to adapting to the culture of a new country. Amongst many immigrants who struggle to adapt to the American culture are those in the Latino Community. According to the U.S Census Bureau (2010), about 52 million Latinos /Hispanics live in the United States, which makes them the largest ethnic minority group living in the United States. The Census Bureau also states that the Latino Community is the fastest …show more content…
However, for the purpose of this topic the focus will be on two that are said to be the most popular within Latino families. The first alternative method of treatment for Latinos is family support system. Many Latino families, especially Mexican American families, traditionally embrace values of solving problems within the family system, and may opt to decline services offered by mental health care professionals (Alvidrez, 1999; Echeverry, 1997; Edgerton & Karno, 1971; Flaskerud 1986; Harris, et al., 2004; Jaco, 1959). Most Latinos will utilize their families and friends when dealing with mental health issues, especially ones dealing with depression. Mexican culture, as well as other Latino cultures, embrace family unity and have the tendency of being close knit as a whole, since family is something they value. A strong emphasis is placed on family as the major source of one’s identity and protection against the hardships of life. This sense of family belonging is intense and limited to family and close friends. People who are not family or close friends are often slow to be given trust, so it is important for Latino individuals to sustain those strong relationships with family and friends as a means to receive support when needed. The family model is an extended one; grandparents, aunts, cousins, and even people who are not biologically related may be considered …show more content…
There is countless evidence to suggest that religiosity and spirituality may play a significant role in the mental health and health outcomes related to Latinos (Applewhite, Biggs, & Herrera, 2009). In a survey of religious beliefs in approximately 2000 Latinos, the majority endorsed the Renewalist Christian belief that ‘‘God wills good health to all believers who have enough faith’’ (Pew Hispanic Center & the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life, 2006). Hispanics were more likely than non-Hispanic Whites to believe that prayer or faith in God can help relieve depression (Cabassa, Lester, & Zayas, 2007; Givens, et al., 2007). Most Latinos will seek help from their church and clergy as opposed to a therapist as they truly believe that this method is the most helpful. As stated by Susman et al., (2008), clergy members expect and hope to see their congregants as often as possible through the course of their lives. Clergy become very close to their congregants and may know multiple generations within a single family if the families are devout churchgoers. When priests, pastors, etc. make such a connection with their congregants it makes it easy for individuals to seek help outside of their support

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