The Importance Of Inaugural Addresses

Good Essays
Register to read the introduction… Herbert Stein, “who for 60 years was an economist and connoisseur of American’s political culture,” discovered that the average number of words per sentence for Inaugural Addresses has steadily decreased: “from Washington through Buchanan the average number of words per sentence was 44; from Lincoln through Wilson, 34; since Wilson, 25.”
Will believes that “the general shortening of sentences reflects, in part, a change in nature of Inaugural Addresses.” He refers to Teddy Roosevelt who called the presidency “a bully pulpit.” Later addresses have had an incentive to tell Americans how to behave with phrases such as “The only thing we have to fear…” and “Ask not…” A more popular phrase which was used by Kennedy and Nixon was “Let us…,” which according to Will means, “For Pete’s sake, pull up your socks and shape up.”
The content of the Inaugural Addresses has also changed. George Washington had to be much more modest, speaking about his personal problems and as much as he would like to rest, his country was calling him. In the beginning with Washington, the issue was that he would be able to turn the presidency
…show more content…
It’s true there has been a major change in literature over the years. Personally, I had some trouble keeping up with the incredibly long sentence made by George Washington. It’s interesting how he partly blames it for the “change in the nature of Inaugural Addresses.” I’m not sure if I see much connection between the two. Also, though shorter sentences shows our reading mental muscles are weaker than our ancestors’, but this does not seem to have any major negative effect on society, unless Will’s statement about the changing in Inaugural Addresses in coordination with shortening of sentences is

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    President Hoover Dbq

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages

    They were blaming them for the failing economy. And in November of 1930, the Democrats won the majority in House. (TS page 847) The Democrats had nominated Franklin Roosevelt for the 1932 election. Roosevelt had blamed Hoover for the Depression and deteriorating economy. With unemployment almost at 25% in 1931 alone, Hoover was careless to defend his record, and Roosevelt proposed a recovery with a New Deal for the country.…

    • 782 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Great Depression Causes

    • 1283 Words
    • 6 Pages

    While I believe that this political cartoon exaggerates a bit, I do agree that the New Deal had many programs that took over a decade to fix the economy; thus proving that the New Deal didn’t quite succeed. In addition to this, the New Deal failed the minorities; more specifically, the African American population. Many, if not all, the relief programs discriminated against African Americans. For example, the National Recovery Administration not only made sure that whites obtained the better job, but also authorized lower wages for blacks. (Document 7) Also the Federal Housing Authority refused housing to blacks in white numbers.…

    • 1283 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the graph in Document 3, the graph shows that the government spending between the years Hoover was in office compared to when Roosevelt was a big difference. When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected as president, the Great Depression already started. He had to spend money in order to fix America. He could of just been like Hoover and do nothing, but instead, he used the try anything approach to fix America. Another example would be in Document 4 the political cartoon displays that Uncle Sam looks sick and represents America.…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Since President Trump’s presidency, his approval rating dropped to the all-time low of 35 percent according to a Marist College Poll. Seventy-five percent of Congress democrats side with Trump’s impeachment, but only 7% of republicans hold the same notion. Prominent republican senators such as John McCain, Rand Paul, and Chuck Grassley are for removing Trump from office, however, the House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says otherwise. Pelosi appeared on CNN’s State of the Union and was quoted saying "I believe that whatever we do, we have a responsibility to first and foremost to unify the nation." In the United States government, the legislative and executive branches make up of two-thirds of the legal authority.…

    • 1694 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    However, he quickly counters with the American desire of “more” and the consequences of an insatiable American public (Bacevich, 16). Another crisis Bacevich wrote of was that of politics. He claims that American democracy has decayed over the years with the president gaining too many unchecked powers (Bacevich, 68). He charges congress with only occasionally trying to limit presidential powers, and only doing so to gain an advantage for their party (Bacevich, 69). Bacevich also…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In my opinion, the Iraq War was the most compelling case for his argument of long term failure. That is because many people realized that the United States did not benefit and suffered more entering a war that was not necessary to enter. It is sad how long this took to realize that overthrowing governments and foreign leaders for economic/political interests has occurred for hundreds of years in the United States and has had more long term consequences. I believe it took the Iraq War for people to realize how long this has been truly going on. The differences of places and events all have different short term benefits and outcomes.…

    • 784 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    These events directly limited senatorial authority by way of the of the people and demonstrated a basic transformation in the late Republic. Over the course of ninety years (between 140 and 50 B.C.E), he deduces that over half of these laws sought to limit the discretionary power of the senate, while the others either provided the Plebeians with rights and power, or essentially land; furthermore, proving that such popular assertion occurred quite frequently during this period. Despite what may be considered a monopolization of oratory and therefore proposed legislation, the populous quite simply did not buy in to the word of the elite hegemony that often. In fact, the public according to Mornstein-Marx was well aware of their opposition to the senate. Adding that a fundamental reason for such autonomous opinion may be a result of individuals like the Gracchi who found themselves in the peculiar position of representing the people while serving in a resistant senate.…

    • 1016 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Martin served out of pride versus necessity gives the reader a different interpretation of the Revolutionary War. Most people are under the impression that serving in the war was more of a requirement than a choice. Mr. Martin challenges this common thought and brings to light reasons of service that extend beyond simply force. This idea changes the historical value of text documents. While the process and flow of the war is described in accurate detail, some of the emotions described within the text may be flawed due to his background and his years following his service.…

    • 1114 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Highly regulated industries […] The industrial landscape was decaying, but the sleek information revolution had not yet emerged to take its place…” (Packer 173). Packer goes on to mention a few more deficiencies in the era comparing it to a much more progressed time of 2007. However, Packer then goes on to point out that, “[T]he deeper structures, the institution that underpin a healthy democratic society, have fallen into a state of decadence” (Packer 173). Packer began to develop what appeared to be his stance, and then in the end revealed that while 1978 was simpler, the democracy that was held at the time was much more solid than in 2007, which considerable more is…

    • 1195 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Though his national statement contained elements of a commemoration for those who were affected by the violence of the day, Bush aimed to catalyze a rally effect. The rally effect, from the viewpoint of political psychology, occurs when an international crisis causes noticeable spikes in presidential approval rating. To illustrate this concept, consider President Franklin D. Roosevelt presiding over the nation during the Pearl Harbor attack. Before the attack occurred, his approval rating rested comfortably at 72% whereas after the attack, his approval rating rose to 84% for nearly 30 weeks. Referring back to Bush, considering his rapidly dwindling approval rating, the rally effect could, in fact, provide the spark necessary to charge the nation toward a unified goal of preventing such devastation from occurring on U.S. soil.…

    • 955 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays