The Importance Of Christianity In The Roman Empire

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Christianity became the greatest religion of the Roman Empire right under the Empire’s eyes. Probably the biggest “mistake” of the Romans was to disregard Christianity as one of its kind and underestimating it as another sector of Judaism (Spielvogel 170). The religion began in Judea, east of the Mediterranean, a region where Romans kept watchful control of. If it depended on Roman rule, Christianity would not have flourished past its place of origin. However, trade played a significant role in the spreading of the Christ’s word outside of Judea’s walls. The Gospel writers and other devout followers, like Peter, went on to become martyrs and die in turn of bringing the teachings of Christianity to other people. Paul, specially, was a champion …show more content…
Christianity made its way through the Roman Empire spreading like fire, despite being persecuted for going against the Greco-Roman beliefs. The prosecutions against the Christians only served to strengthen the religion, as it looked for ways to protect itself by developing a “more centralized organization of its various church communities” ( Spielvogel …show more content…
While Constantine was a pagan and did not grow up a Christian, the religion was familiar to him because of this mother. However, it was not until an important battle that Constantine converted to being a Christian. Spielvogel describes that just before battle against Maxentius forces, Constantine saw an image of the Christian cross with the saying “In this sign, you will conquer” (178). The leader then put crosses on the helmet of all soldiers going into battle with him and the troop became victorious. It was then that Constantine became a believer in Christianity and its monotheistic God. In 313 CE, the emperor issued the Edict of Milan, which made Christianity a legal religion in Rome. (Spielvogel 178). In an attempt to protect the church against Arianism and strengthen the religion, the emperor called the Council of Nicaea to establish the core beliefs of the Church about the essence of Christ as the Son of God, leading to the Nicene Creed (Spielvogel 179). Circa 300 CE, Christianity becomes stronger than ever and is declared the official religion of the Roman Empire under emperor

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