Christianity In Roman Empire Essay

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Christianity became the greatest religion of the Roman Empire right under the Empire’s eyes. Probably the biggest “mistake” of the Romans was to disregard Christianity as one of its kind and underestimating it as another sector of Judaism (Spielvogel 170). The religion began in Judea, east of the Mediterranean, a region where Romans kept watchful control of. If it depended on Roman rule, Christianity would not have flourished past its place of origin. However, trade played a significant role in the spreading of the Christ’s word outside of Judea’s walls. The Gospel writers and other devout followers, like Peter, went on to become martyrs and die in turn of bringing the teachings of Christianity to other people. Paul, specially, was a champion in diffusing the word of God. According to Spielvogel, “the structure of the Roman Empire itself aided the growth of Christianity” (170). Paul and other apostles traveled with groups along Roman trade routes and established small Christian groups along the way. Soon, private homes became social spaces where families shared meals, as part of their Christian practice. Spielvogel says that these were early Christian groups that met to celebrate the sacrament of the Eucharist, which signifies the celebration of Jesus’ Last Supper (169). Usually the woman or man of the house were in charge of these houses. However, it was very common for the authority to be a woman. …show more content…
Christianity made its way through the Roman Empire spreading like fire, despite being persecuted for going against the Greco-Roman beliefs. The prosecutions against the Christians only served to strengthen the religion, as it looked for ways to protect itself by developing a “more centralized organization of its various church communities” ( Spielvogel

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