Death Penalty: Take Away The Harm To Society

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Take Away the Harm to Society There has been constant debate when it comes to the topic of capital punishment, while some support it, others oppose it to be carried out. Arguments have been made as to whether or not it is humane or morally correct to execute murderers. Although this is the case, the number of individuals who approves of the death penalty outnumbers those who do not as a well-known public opinion poll company, Gallup Poll “finds 74% of Americans saying they favor the death penalty for a person convicted of murder, while 23% are not in favor” in a 2005 poll (Jones). Known as ‘one of the fathers of classical criminal theory,’ Beccaria has stated that the punishment must fit the crime and the death penalty can be justified because …show more content…
Continuing from the deterrent argument, professional translator and blog writer, Casey Carmical argues that “the death penalty is actually 100% effective as a deterrent to crime: the murderer will never commit another crime once he has been executed” (Carmical). It is not uncommon for murderers that get a chance to be paroled to go out to the world to commit another crime. Some of these killers have mental illnesses and cannot even control their own behaviors which makes it threatening to the individuals that killers have contact with in their daily lives. This possibility can only be eliminated through the capital punishment because killers can continue their behaviors even in prison. To illustrate, Carmical suggests that a “study found that of 11,404 persons originally convicted of “willful homicide” and released during 1955 and 1974, 34 were returned to prison for commission of a subsequent criminal homicide during the first year alone” (Carmical). These prisoners do not deserve another chance to be free, let alone a chance or possibility for them to be able to slaughter another innocent life. The probability of a murderer committing another murder should be zero, because these creatures should be executed before that happens. Allowing them to make the same mistake twice is a flaw on behalf of …show more content…
One of the most debatable reasons to why the death penalty should be abolished is the rate of error and the fear of killing the innocent. Although a study from Columbia University claims that their “report found an overall rate of error of 68 percent” (Whitehead); this number is a fraudulent claim due to overturn of cases of those who might not even be innocent just because new laws were put into place or of judicial decisions (Justice for All). To further this point, a non-profit organization, Justice for All, asserts that “opponents claim that 69 "innocent" death row inmates have been released since 1973. Just a casual review, using the Death Penalty Information Center 's (DPIC 's) own case descriptions, reveals that of 39 cases reviewed, that the DPIC offers no evidence of innocence in 29, or 78%, of those cases” (Justice for All). This proves that out of all the cases reviewed, over three quarters of them are not truly proven innocent but prisoners were still released. Prisoners may be released because of the prolonged procedure of the super due process for capital murderers, which allows for exaggerating the process and weakening of the evidence because it has been so long since the date the crime was committed. Furthermore, the United States’ criminal justice system benefits the accused because as long as they have reasonable doubt,

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