The Imitation Of Life And The Bluest Eye Analysis

Improved Essays
The Imitation of Life and The Bluest Eye were two pieces of work that let their audience take a look at the world through the eyes of females in the 1930s. The Imitation of Life debuted in 1934 and was produced by John Stahl. Because it was set and made in a time before the Civil Rights Movement, there were a lot of guidelines that the production crew had to conform to that so the “wrong” message was not being displayed. There was a lot of scandal behind the making of the movies because many felt as though Louise Beavers, who played Aunt Delilah, should have received an Oscar for her performance in the movie but she did not because of the color of her skin. We get to look into the life of Ms. B. Pullman—a recently widowed white woman with a …show more content…
From the beginning the readers understand that Pecola Breedlove’s main desire is to have blue eyes. That is what she feels would make her beautiful. This idea has come from what society and media has told her what beauty is. She sees people like Shirley Temple on a milk cup with blue eyes and realizes that she can’t relate to the people that she sees on a milk cup because they look nothing like her. This topic is discussed in “Probing Racial Dilemmas in The Bluest Eye with the Spyglass of Psychology”. The authors of this text tell us that “Such glamorization of the idol whose race is different to the adorer can be found both in literature and in psychological analysis…showing that African American children were convinced that it was not best to be black” (Zebialowicz & Palasinski, 2009, pg.222). This shows us how Pecola is struggling with her identity similar to Peola. These two girls really battled with their identity which ultimately took a toll on the relationships they had with their …show more content…
Pecola had a tough life from the moment she was born. Her family was poor and ugly and the town they lived in looked down upon them. She experienced more than what she was supposed to experience at a young age such as her parents’ sexual encounters and her father raping her and impregnating her. This is totally different from Peola who grew up with a loving mother who always put her first. Her main problem was that she was a black girl that could pass as a white girl, and that weighed heavy on her. Both Pecola and Peola were born during a time where being black equaled hopelessness. Both of these characters suffer from what Nasser Maleki and Mohammad Javad Haj’jari—authors of “Negrophobia and Anti-Negritude In Morrison’s The Bluest Eye”—would call “negrophobia” and that their “negrophobia not only serves the white race, but also challenges the black’s attempt at survival…” (Maleki & Mohammad, 2015, pg. 81). With this mindset, the girls basically disown their own race which gives the white race exactly what they wanted. They wanted black people to be uncomfortable at all times and to not embrace who they are. The novel tells us, “Being a minority in both caste and class, we moved about anyway on the hem of life, struggling to consolidate our weaknesses and hang on, or creep singly up into the major folds of the garment” (Morrison, 1970, pg. 17). This ultimately makes it hard

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    On page sixty-six of this passage, Spillers ties in an outside source to explicate the unjust blame that which black women are considered the bearers of. Spillers brings into play Moynihan’s “tangle of pathology” which thoroughly explicates that “the “underachievement” of black males of the lower classes is primarily the fault of black females...” This extremely misogynistic and generalized statement is used as a tool to show how the black minority group should put men in the highest power because that’s how white people doing and therefore, must be the absolute best way to live. Although this statement in particular is, in my opinion, the most ignorant reference used in the passage, it is also one of the most successful references in explicated yet another way in which the female body is held “captive” by the male…

    • 1093 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Different from many other writings of American literature that discuss the periods of deep racism that took place, The Bluest Eye written by Toni Morrison, does not become involved directly with those events, instead, it focuses on exploring the remaining effects of race through self-hatred. Many characters from the novel who are African American are devastated with the cultural and already imposed notions of white perfection to the limit that they hate themselves for not being up to society`s standards. The best character that Morrison utilized to depict these outcomes is Pecola Breedlove, a passive, eleven-year old, black girl whose lack of parental guidance and self-hatred lead her to be absorbed by the imposed notions of beauty. Pecola…

    • 1642 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    In the theme of The Bluest Eye, Toni Morrison illustrates the destructive nature of whiteness being a scale for acceptance through certain black characters of this novel. The characters that display this destruction are Pecola Breedlove, Geraldine, and Pauline Breedlove. Pecola Breedlove desperately searches for ways of obtaining blue eyes because she believes it is the only way of receiving love and acceptance from her mother and community. Geraldine uses whiteness as a scale of accepting others which causes an emotional disconnect among her family. Pauline Breedlove uses whiteness as a scale for measuring the beauty of people and their importance.…

    • 1436 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    We cannot consider who black women are as black people without considering their sex, nor can we consider who they are as women without considering their race.” (White, 6). The womanhood of black and white women was interdependent and relied on one another. The white woman’s superiority came from the racism that degraded black women. Sexism was a factor that caused these groups of women to have so little in common. African…

    • 1074 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The negative stereotype of African American being “sexually aggressive, promiscuous, and lacking moral virtues characteristics of “normal women” (Greene, p. 241-242) add fuel to people’s interpretation on what African American person is and what they are like as woman. African American woman do not share the same characteristics as White woman, and this leads them to continually being discriminated against by society. The negative stereotypes attacking African Woman make it impossible on the ideal on how Queer African woman should be portrayed. African American woman hold onto great virtues and morals that are tied to their ancestors from Africa. “The African American had membership in various tribes and spoke numerous languages as well as having different system of family values, family relations, and tribal customs.” (Greene, p. 242) There ties with their African American heritage have made them the powerful woman they are, which should not be associated with a negative interpretation.…

    • 1125 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Maycomb’s Disease British writer Amelia Barr once said, “Injustice is a sixth sense, and rouses all the others” (A-Z Quotes). In To Kill A Mockingbird, Harper Lee, the author, displayed different cases of injustice in the cozy town of Maycomb. For instance, black women experienced inequity just because of their race. In addition, those who believed in advocating African Americans encountered persecution for their beliefs. Correspondingly, different adults in a young girl’s life attempted to take away her optimism and constraint her to behave like everyone else.…

    • 718 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye: Racism and Self Worth Ever since the beginning of American history, race has played a role on how people view themselves, whites being the higher value versus blacks. In Toni Morrison’s novel, The Bluest Eye, Morrison unveils the values of the social community and how white standards affect how African-Americans value themselves. The life of Pecola Breedlove depicts how the social pedestal can make a 12 year old black girl feel unloved, and ultimately corrupt her life at a young age. Morrison also shows the ultimate breakdown of internalized and institutionalized racism, which is huge on how other characters in the novel see their own race and how they see themselves versus others during the time period of the…

    • 1429 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Self-Help Lesson

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Lesson 3 starts off asking what is your worth as a black woman? This question takes time to think about because it a hard question to answer as a black woman. Our self- worth has us feeling unworthy due to the color of our skin. The media has power over what black women think of themselves and once were caught up in it, that’s when we begin to doubt ourselves. Black women perceptions of themselves have changed because of the things we say to ourselves that we will never say out loud such as: I wish my skin was lighter, I wish my hair was more like a white woman or at least not so course or nappy, or I feel in competition with white women or light skinned women.…

    • 825 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Black Motherhood Analysis

    • 1105 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This process of othering clearly defines us versus them, and is embroiled in white supremacist politics as well as the politics of difference (Ross, 10) For instance, the existence of a black single mother (presumably living off welfare) is depicted as lewd, diseased, indecent, and even capable of ruining the structure of idealized white families (McCormack, 431). Certainly, black mothers are alienated from traditional or respectable motherhood through blaming potential offspring for hypothetical future crimes and through identifying black motherhood as dangerous, perhaps indicating a long history and legacy of discrimination of, and fascination with, the female black body. Moreover, popular constructions of women of color result from “an interlocked set of public policies of behavior modification and population control…reproductive punishment”, leading to the suspicion of, and criminalization of, black wombs (Ross, 8). By othering black women, representation of black women become a veneer for social occurrences that are actually the result of rampant structural inequalities, a fact that both McCormack and Ross mention (McCormack, 434, Ross, 5). In this way, black women are transformed into the “public face of the welfare mother” and blamed for social inadequacies (McCormack, 432).…

    • 1105 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    As a result, the archaic illusion of color-blind therapy can be ameliorated and the psychological stress of being Black in America can be integrated into the biopsychosocial spiritual narrative of Black female clients. Only then can Black women be safe enough to be angry without fear of being characterized as angry Black women”(33).I’ve come to a conclusion, similar to Ashleys. That the angry black woman myth is just that a myth. It is clinical, a problem, that has evolved from many generations of distress that has socially controlled and compelled many people to believe it to be true. Which in term causes a lot of harm to black women as a group.…

    • 1355 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays