The Imitation Of Life And The Bluest Eye Analysis

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The Imitation of Life and The Bluest Eye were two pieces of work that let their audience take a look at the world through the eyes of females in the 1930s. The Imitation of Life debuted in 1934 and was produced by John Stahl. Because it was set and made in a time before the Civil Rights Movement, there were a lot of guidelines that the production crew had to conform to that so the “wrong” message was not being displayed. There was a lot of scandal behind the making of the movies because many felt as though Louise Beavers, who played Aunt Delilah, should have received an Oscar for her performance in the movie but she did not because of the color of her skin. We get to look into the life of Ms. B. Pullman—a recently widowed white woman with a …show more content…
From the beginning the readers understand that Pecola Breedlove’s main desire is to have blue eyes. That is what she feels would make her beautiful. This idea has come from what society and media has told her what beauty is. She sees people like Shirley Temple on a milk cup with blue eyes and realizes that she can’t relate to the people that she sees on a milk cup because they look nothing like her. This topic is discussed in “Probing Racial Dilemmas in The Bluest Eye with the Spyglass of Psychology”. The authors of this text tell us that “Such glamorization of the idol whose race is different to the adorer can be found both in literature and in psychological analysis…showing that African American children were convinced that it was not best to be black” (Zebialowicz & Palasinski, 2009, pg.222). This shows us how Pecola is struggling with her identity similar to Peola. These two girls really battled with their identity which ultimately took a toll on the relationships they had with their …show more content…
Pecola had a tough life from the moment she was born. Her family was poor and ugly and the town they lived in looked down upon them. She experienced more than what she was supposed to experience at a young age such as her parents’ sexual encounters and her father raping her and impregnating her. This is totally different from Peola who grew up with a loving mother who always put her first. Her main problem was that she was a black girl that could pass as a white girl, and that weighed heavy on her. Both Pecola and Peola were born during a time where being black equaled hopelessness. Both of these characters suffer from what Nasser Maleki and Mohammad Javad Haj’jari—authors of “Negrophobia and Anti-Negritude In Morrison’s The Bluest Eye”—would call “negrophobia” and that their “negrophobia not only serves the white race, but also challenges the black’s attempt at survival…” (Maleki & Mohammad, 2015, pg. 81). With this mindset, the girls basically disown their own race which gives the white race exactly what they wanted. They wanted black people to be uncomfortable at all times and to not embrace who they are. The novel tells us, “Being a minority in both caste and class, we moved about anyway on the hem of life, struggling to consolidate our weaknesses and hang on, or creep singly up into the major folds of the garment” (Morrison, 1970, pg. 17). This ultimately makes it hard

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