Evolution Of The Civil Rights Movement

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In my Mid-Term paper, I will explain what is the Civil Right. Such as, the history and evolution of the Civil Right. And what is the civil right purpose? Then, I will also talk about the challenges faced by some Civil Rights leaders, such as Doctor Martin Luther King Junior, Rosa Louis McCauley Parks and how the civil rights leader involved their community and how the stressed peaceful violence. Finally, I will explain what is the EECO (The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission) and why we do need that law.
Historically, to understand the Civil Right movement, we need to go back. Findlay had written an article about the timeline events of the Civil Right act. Findlay wrote that” On December 18, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln 's abolished slavery, after the ratify, the 13th amendment, that was 153 years ago. The civil rights movement had brought clarification upon the slavery segregation laws.” They are also saying, “in 1963 Martin Luther King, Jr delivers his famous speech: “I have a Dream” in front of hundreds of thousands of people in the March on Washington.” Furthermore, as Findlay argues, in the same year” Equal Pay Act of 1963 passed by Congress,
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Many parents would attempt to enroll their children in all-white schools and fail. Due to that situation, in 1951, a girl by the name of Linda Brown was deprived of registration to an all-white summer school. Then, her father, Oliver Brown, contacted the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and with their help he filed a complaint. He testified, saying all-white summer school was closer in distance to the closest all African-Americans school. Unfortunately, there were many other cases similar to this. As a matter of that, in 1952, all the cases joined together and three years later the court favored in Brown vs. Board of Education. (Clark Hine, et al. 575 to

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