The Harlem Renaissance: A Huge Arts Movement

Good Essays
What was it? The Harlem renaissance was a huge arts movement started by the African-American community of Harlem in the 1920’s. In a time where race riots and lynchings were nothing out of the ordinary, a professional artist of any sort was not considered a legitimate career choice for an African-American person. The Harlem renaissance was a movement that helped to bring forth talented black people and also to create positivity and creativity in a time of great turmoil.

Who was it? There were many people who were part of the Harlem renaissance, however, some who are more known include Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, W.E.B DuBois, Eubie Blake, Duke Ellington, Aaron Douglas, and James Weldon Johnson.

Where did it take place?
…show more content…
The events that took place in Harlem inspired many neighbouring cities to partake in the boom of the African-American art scene.

When did it happen? As previously stated, the Harlem Renaissance started in the 1920’s and lasted until the beginning of the great depression; however, many writers and other artists continued to create and publish throughout the depression.

Why did it happen? The Harlem renaissance was a huge boom of culture in an era where racist people viewed African-Americans as untalented and worthless people who could not thrive off of careers as professional artists. The Harlem renaissance was not only a chance to prove to a racist America that black people could in fact be talented but was also a chance to showcase the talent and hard work of the black community. Many also say that the Harlem renaissance was a peaceful protest against the oppressors (example the

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    The Black Press Analysis

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This false image of progressive treatment drove people to find employment in the North. Because the Chicago Defender was a major voice for African Americans, its followers took the advice seriously. The press was as powerful enough as to make major life decisions for some people. Needless to say, the southern economy declined even further than it was after the Civil War. Southerners despised blacks but depended on them for the backbone of their economy.…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For example, due to the decimated economy of the South because of the Civil War, many “African-Americans headed [north] for jobs, education, and opportunities, [especially in Harlem], known as the Great Migration” (“The Harlem Renaissance” 1). Blacks migrated to the North to escape the prejudiced Southerners and to find jobs because of the economic boom. Although many African-Americans were leaving the region where they had lived for generations, most of them left with bright eyes full of courage. By taking residence in the North, specifically Harlem, the negroes unknowingly established the birthplace for the revival of black pride. Because of the mass growth of “intellectuals, artists, entrepreneurs, and advocates [in Harlem,] Harlem became known as the Black Mecca” (“The Harlem Renaissance” 2).…

    • 791 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    As quickly as the Harlem became center of attraction, it lost the main reason that caused African Americans to Harlem, which was employment opportunities. African American were primarily forced out by white workers in an effort to preserve themselves. The financial backing and energy of white was swept from many African American projects, including substantial support of publications such as the NAACP’s The Crisis. The financial support that brought many artist to Harlem, was the same cause of many artists who drifting from Harlem to other places of opportunity such as Washington D.C. and Paris. The Harlem Renaissance is a historical timeframe, where African Americans took a liberating step to create their own imaginative and cultural identity.…

    • 807 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    They feel that they have been wronged by the whites. These blacks had been slaves or decedents of slaves, leaving their rural communities in search of a new beginning and a chance to create a new black American culture. Big cities like Harlem where supposed to make that dream come true. When rural blacks got to the city of Harlem, they realized that life was not that easy. Work was not as plentiful as they hoped and they could not get away from white oppression and discrimination.…

    • 1332 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance represented the birth of a new beginning of freedom and identity for the black artists. Following the Great Migration, blacks began to form black communities and the level of confidence in themselves and their culture. Blacks became active, known and self-assertive. Through the arts, the idea of a new type of proud, self-accepting Negro was constantly expressed. This is revealed in Zora Neale Hurston’s writing, because she uses Southern vernacular as well as Harlem slang, to the disdain of other African American authors.…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Harlem Renaissance

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages

    First and foremost, the works and movement itself that was the Harlem Renaissance completely transformed the way in which America and the entire world viewed African-Americans. With their new identity, a great social and racial consciousness came into play and African-Americans assumed a new social role that expanded previous roles in arts and politics. This being a result of the Harlem Renaissance movement being one that, as Steven Carl Tracy described “drew upon individual creativity, organized black support, and white patronage, cooperation, and in some cases, exploitation to achieve success” (12). One instance is evident where after co-writing the script for the screenplay Way Down South, Hughes failed to achieve more success in the screen writing industry, attributing this to racial discrimination in the movie trade. Following the Renaissance however, more and more African-American screenwriters and actors made their appearance on the big screen without being forced to play into traditional black stereotypes.…

    • 1482 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In this time the Renaissance had caused a postive shift in the black community. Whereas in the black community the injustice of killing innocent blacks has caused a negative shift. They were now able to inspire one another, as they developed a new beginning of expressionism within the black community. He states this because he knew the race relationship is not understood, but there will be more prejudice to come. Locke was accurate noting that more prejudice days were to come because, now in the 21st century white on black crimes has become a major…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Around that time in America it was very segregated which makes Wright’s story "Big Black Good Man” more powerful. Although Wright didn’t live in America, the things that were going on in his home country had affected him. Many authors argue that Richard Wright was heavily influenced by what is known to be The Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance is a movement that took place in Harlem, New York. It was an intellectual artistic musical explosion of African American culture.…

    • 1549 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The harlem renaissance wanted to demonstrate artistic ways of the brutally and injustice of america’s society. The harlem renaissance is different from the civil rights movement in the 1950s and 60s by showing the betrayal in art forms than in speaking out a loud. The harlem renaissance showed that they were going to express their heritage in the black culture. It tried to change the view of whites eyes to the blacks showing that they…

    • 706 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The most prominent conflict within the culture wars was the tension between black and white culture in American society. After the Great Migration of African Americans from the South to the North the friction between the races became even thicker than it had been before. The increase of black culture in the mainstream culture through jazz and blues, and the Harlem Renaissance discomforted the white sumpericist. The racism and discrimination by white people in both the North and the South aided the rise of the Ku Klux Klan. At the same time America was running the ¨Red Scare¨ campaign against communist ¨threats¨ to American democracy.…

    • 534 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Decent Essays