The Great Fire Of Rome Essay

2235 Words 9 Pages
The Great fire of Rome was a devastating fire that began on the night, between the 18th and 19th of July in 64 AD. The fire lasted for 6 days and died down but reignited again for 3 days. This event is significant to the classical world, as 3 districts were entirely destroyed, 7 suffered serious damage and only 4 districts survived, only after 10 years since Nero became Emperor of Rome. At least two-thirds of the city was ruined. Following the fire, a rebuilding programme was led by Nero, such as the building of the Domus Aurea. This was completed but did not get much attention from the Romans. This allows us to have a better understanding of Roman life and the society. It is still unknown today, of what truly caused the fire and who caused …show more content…
Nero blamed Christians, saying they were guilty of the fire, but the citizens of Rome were not fully convinced. Instead, they heard of Nero’s future plans to build Neropolis (a series of palaces) within the city of Rome. This news leads the citizens to only distrust more of Nero, despite his actions in supporting those left without following the fire, as described by Tacitus. As the years grew, Nero tried his best to increase his popularity of “kindness”; instead people’s distrust of Nero only grew stronger. In the Annals (Tacitus) and as written by Cassius Dio, during the fire the people of Rome were “grief-stricken and panicked”. They were shocked and confused by the sudden accident. Some of the Romans tried to help others rescue loved ones while others couldn’t, and all effort to stop the fire were prevented by gangs of men who often demanded to be under orders. The actions of these men may have also lead to suspicion that Nero had ordered the …show more content…
It was named the Colossus Neronis. 985 feet in length and 295 feet in width, the property was able to build an Amphitheatre, bath/gymnasium and a market. The baths had both “salted and sulphurous” water, from the Albulae springs. In addition, there were vast gardens, woods and even zoos, where various species of animals strolled, as well as statues, fountains, grottoes and porticoes with landscapes painted upon them. Surrounding the artificial lake were “made-up” seaside villages and forests. The lake was so large that ships could manoeuvre in it. However, this tremendous palace was not so cheap to be built. Nero went against the advice of his trusted advisor, Seneca and removed temple treasures to sell and fund his palace. He also claimed money from his people. In the position of a Roman, this was a major offence towards the ancient gods. Following Nero’s death, his successors buried the palace, and on top of it the Baths of Titus and Trajan were built, and where the artificial lake became the famous tourist attraction, the Colosseum. The Domus Aurea was not rediscovered until the Renaissance period. Only recently has the Domus Aurea been reopened to the public, and only a small section of the villa

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