The Genetic Theories Of Alzheimer's Disease

1096 Words 4 Pages
There are many causes of dementia and according to Janssen Pharmaceutica N.V., “There are some causes of dementia that are treatable which are head injuries, brain tumors, infections (such as meningitis, HIV/AIDS, or syphilis), simple and normal pressure hydrocephalus (i.e. when the fluid in which the brain floats is collecting outside or in the cavities of the brain, compressing it from outside), hormone disorders (i.e. that is, disorders of hormone-secreting and hormone-regulating organs such as the thyroid gland), metabolic disorders (i.e. such as diseases of the liver, pancreas, or kidneys that disrupt the balances of chemicals in the blood), hypoxia (i.e. poor oxygenation of the blood), nutrition (i.e. vitamin deficiencies), drug abuse …show more content…
“To understand the genetic theories of Alzheimer’s disease, we must first appreciate the nature and role of proteins. Proteins are fundamental components of all living cells, including, of course, brain cells. They are large molecules made up of chains of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur. There are many different kinds of proteins, each with a different function. Collectively, they are essential for the proper functioning of an organism” (Comer, 2014). Comer also explains that, “The plaques and tangles that are so plentiful in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients seem to occur when two important proteins start acting in a frenzied manner. Abnormal activity by the beta-amyloid protein is key to the repeated formation of plaques” (2014). Researchers have found that early-onset Alzheimer’s, which is onset before the age of 65, run in families. Personally, I have had one friend of my family get Alzheimer’s at the age 51 was when her family saw changes in their mom’s behavior. Ronald Comer describes that, “Researchers have learned that this form of Alzheimer’s disease can be caused by abnormities in the genes responsible for the production of two proteins-the beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP) and the presenilin protein. Apparently, some families transmit mutations, or abnormal forms, of one or both of these genes-mutations that lead ultimately to abnormal beta amyloid protein buildups and to …show more content…
In my experience with my Grandfather, this stage was very true. My Grandmother denied that he had Alzheimer’s and would blame his forgetfulness on him being old. There are several stages to Alzheimer’s Disease. In the early stages people forget recent events, but they clearly remember things that happened many years ago. I have personally experienced this stage as well, my Grandfather remember his farm in South Dakota, which he lived at 50 years prior to him being diagnosed. He also remembered his pet donkey Josie which was his families pet around the same time frame. In later stages of the disease, people can no longer remember past events and often do not remember family members, and some victims do even recognize themselves. As the disease progresses people may not remember their own home that they have lived in for years, and have trouble with times and places. In my experience with this debilitating disease my Grandfather had problems with all of these and many more. It so hard to watch helplessly on the sidelines, so to speak, and know there is nothing you can do to help the victim. In conclusion, as you can see there are many helpless things that happen to a victim of Alzheimer’s disease. There may be a genetic link to the disease but scientists are still researching this and are searching for a cure. They have been searching for a cure since the first

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