The Fermi Paradox

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The Fermi Paradox and Goldilocks zone are two great reasons for life on other plants, however, the Fermi Paradox could fall either way. It could fall for or against life on other planets because of this there are many scientists working through to find what's true. While people may choose their side and think that there is or isn’t life on other planets. There are thousands of conspiracy theories about alien life being real. If so, why haven’t they contacted us? Are they just not as technologically advanced as we are? That’s a short summary of the thoughts of Enrico Fermi explaining how the Fermi Paradox can side with believers and non believers. A Goldilocks zone is a zone where there the circumstances would be just right for life, including …show more content…
Proxima B could be anywhere from 1.3 - more than 70 times greater than our Earth (Approximately Like Earth: Proxima B). Considering it is located within the Goldilocks zone it is possible to have life on it, if the circumstances are correct. “Proxima b does have an atmosphere, and does support life. And if there is life on a planet four light years away from Earth, wouldn't the possibility of life on Earth seem equally far-fetched to the inhabitants of that planet?” (Approximately Like Earth: Proxima B) The Fermi Paradox was discovered by Enrico Fermi in 1943. While he was at a social gathering in Los Alamos, New Mexico. “ Enrico Fermi asked the penetrating question "Where are they?" "Where are who?" his startled companions replied. "Why, the extraterrestrials," responded the Nobel Prize–winning physicist, who was at the time one of the lead scientists on the top-secret Manhattan Project to build the first atomic bomb” (Fermi Paradox). Fermi’s thought process while at his social gathering pertaining to …show more content…
Proxima B’s circumstances may not be right for life to be on this planet. “There are, however, a number of reasons to doubt that there is life on Proxima b. If the planet is rocky, it could be Earth-like, but it could also be a frozen, Mars-like planet with no atmosphere or a hot, Venus-like planet. It all depends on Proxima b's chemical composition and whether it has either a magnetic field or an atmosphere.” (Approximately Like Earth: Proxima B). The Fermi Paradox explains this as if there were life on other planets, then why haven’t they made contact with us yet? “Our galaxy is some 11 to 13.6 billion (109) years old and contains perhaps 100 to 400 billion stars. If just one advanced civilization had arisen in this period of time and attained the technology necessary to travel between the stars, that advanced civilization could have diffused through or swept across the entire galaxy within 50 million to 100 million years—leaping from star to star, starting up other civilizations, and spreading intelligent life everywhere. But as we look around, we do not see a galaxy teeming with intelligent life, nor do we have any technically credible evidence of visitations or contact with alien civilizations, so we must conclude that perhaps no such civilization has ever arisen in the 13.6-billion-year history of the galaxy. Therefore, the paradox: Although we might expect to see signs of a universe filled with intelligent life (on the basis of

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