How Did The Market Revolution Change America

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As American factories and farms produced more goods, legislators and businessmen created faster and cheaper ways to transport these goods to consumers. They first attempted to create gravel roads to travel on, but this method proved too slow and expensive. Eventually, in 1817, the New York legislature put a financing system into place for the creation of the Erie Canal, a solution that will eventually lead to connecting the world. This was a three-hundred and sixty-four mile waterway connecting the Hudson River to Lake Erie. This sprouted a national canal boom. In the 1850s, railroads joined the canals as another passageway for economic growth. This was all part of the Market Revolution, an economic transformation. This Market Revolution changed the everyday life for many Americans, some benefited and some not so much, but overall this was a beneficial development for Americans and was able to connect the Northern and Southern regions. The Market Revolution of the nineteenth century resulted in sweeping changes across the United States, from slave trading and commercial agriculture to the …show more content…
It brought prosperity to farmers, and even though it did not benefit all Americans, it improved the way America was ran and would eventually prove beneficial to all. It improved American technology, communication, and transportation. American inventors truly transformed America for the better during this time period. With a larger network connected with improved ways of transportation, Americans were able to sell, buy, and trade goods to places never imagined possible before. With this came inventions to travel by, such as trains and steamboats improving the speed of the market. Inventions such as the cotton gin, self-raking reapers, sewing machines, and steel plows tackled tasks quick that were once named difficult. It improved the way of life for Americans, and these improvements are still used

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