Conclusion For Huckleberry Finn

1434 Words 6 Pages
The ending of stories are meant to deliver meaningful messages to the audience, evoking powerful emotions. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, the last part of the story deviates from a story about the close bond Huckleberry Finn and Jim, a runaway slave share on their journey to one about the childish stunts, Huck and his old friend, Tom Sawyer, attempt to pull of in order to save Jim from captivity. The ending of the story disappoints the reader because Huck reverses, squandering the knowledge gained from his adventures. Throughout the story, Huck’s character matures, but later with Tom, he reverts back to his childish behavior at the start of the book, a regression that ultimately diminishes the value of Huck’s journey. …show more content…
Everybody that wants to join has got to take an oath, and write his name in blood. Everybody was willing” (7). Huck joins his friend’s juvenile game by acting out a romanticized variant of robbers who plunder large sums of money and take blood oaths. Without a care in the world, Huck remains free of all the hardships in life, never needing to question the reality of a life as a robber. Playing with Tom Sawyer is all fun and games for Huck, suggesting that he is still immature and has a long way to go. In this stage of the story, Huck displays a flaw in his ability to act with maturity, a sign that he will go through internal changes as the story progresses. One of the major signs of Huck’s initial growth in maturity occurs when he attempts to take back the money that a pair of conmen scheme from the three Wilkes sisters who are grieving the loss of their father: “I felt so ornery and low down and mean that I says to myself, my mind’s made up; I’ll hive that money for them or bust” (175). Huck experiences guilt because he helps the two men manipulate the sisters when they are vulnerable. As guilt overwhelms Huck, he finds the men’s actions intolerable, refusing to be part of their schemes any longer. In fact, Huck, exhibiting …show more content…
At first, Huck is desensitized towards slavery, believing that black men like Jim must not escape from their masters no matter the reason, criticizing Jim for considering how to steal his children away from captivity: “Just see what a difference it made in him the minute he judged he was about free. It was according to the old saying, ‘Give a nigger an inch and he’ll take an ell’” (88). Initially, Huck does not view Jim as a person. but property that is running away. He even thinks that Jim takes things too far, never considering the pain Jim must be feeling, distanced from his children and wife. Consequently, Huck acts as if Jim is sub-human and needs to be on a leash at all times. He never considers that Jim cares so deeply for his family, willing to risk getting captured just for the chance to steal them back. His understanding of Jim is controlled by the system of oppression that suppresses black men, identifying them as unfit for society. Jim appears alien to Huck who does not yet realize that Jim is a man and deserves the same respect as any other man deserves. When Jim is captured, Huck faces the choice of either saving him or informing his previous master, but he begins to remember all of the adventures with Jim: “Do everything he could think of for me, and how good he always was; and

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