The Emotions Of Love In Aldous Huxley's Brave New World

2095 Words 9 Pages
How is one to be considered human when the emotions of feeling happy, sad, mad, or even in love, those feelings, do not exist? That feeling that overwhelms oneself with an uncontrollable amount of anger and remorse when one first hears the news that a close family member, very possibly the one that one loves most, has just passed away. How does one not feel that deep, stabbing pain in the bottom of your heart that is aching for that person to be in your life just one more day? In the counter emotion applying to this aspect, what would life be like without love, without a lifelong partner, without children of your own that one undeniably loves an unconditional amount? Every person deserves to get that sensation that runs through ones body when …show more content…
Lastly, how is one considered human when there is no such thing as being a mother or a father and experiencing the birth of ones own children. In Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World there is a civilization that is said to be a perfect world, but in this utopia none of these emotions ever existed. The people in this perfect world are completely unaware of what it is like to have feelings for anything or what it is like to have ones own family. All of these feelings and emotions are genetically engineered out of the natural development of every human in this new …show more content…
Mental stability is achieved by genetically engineering each and every person that is brought into this world. Henry Ford’s invention of the assembly line is used to execute the intentions of creating everyone alike in mass amounts. In this world, “cloning transforms reproduction into manufacture, and babies into products” (Morgan, Shanahan, Welsh 137-138). Henry Ford is worshipped in this world; He is their only known God. Once each person is created successfully, they start a process called Conditioning on each individual. Conditioning is the mechanism that is used to convince a person of what they are scared of and what they are to like. It takes away all personal feelings and all individuality. They are engineered to be initially stripped of their capability to love someone or something and all they care about is work and their own personal pleasure. No knowledge of family or the process of bearing children is ever obtained by these people. To reality, it sounds as if this perfect world is actually a living hell. As Mark S. Frankel says in Inheritable Genetic Modification and a Brave New World: Did Huxley have it wrong?, by doing this and taking away all natural human feelings “we would be venturing into unknown territory, but without any sense of where the boundaries lie, much less with an understanding of what it means to cross such boundaries” (34). This means that once the

Related Documents