Diagnostics Criteria For Asperger's Syndrome

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Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a pervasive development disorder that is widely described as a mild form of autism. It is a lifelong developmental disability that affects how people perceive the world and interact with others. Asperger’s is an autistic named after Hans Asperger a child psychiatrist from Austria., who in 1944, described children in his practice who lacked nonverbal communication, had limited understanding of other feelings, and were physically clumsy. Asperger’s behavior has many faces. Asperger’s are all different in all individuals so their behavior may differ too. If you have Asperger’s syndrome, you have it for life. It is not an illness or disease and it can’t be cured. Some researches and people on the AS have advocated a shift …show more content…
The DSM-IV had specific diagnostics criteria for Asperger’s Syndrome. Revision of the DSM-IV, with a 5th edition (DSM-V) published in May 2013. In the new version, Asperger’s Syndrome is included in the same diagnostic group as people with Autism and pervasive developmental disorders.
Asperger’s is diagnosed when person struggles with social relationships and communication and show unusually narrow interest and resistance to change, but has good intelligence and language skills. Early intervention in autism has been shown to improve cognitive skills and to affect progress in cognitive levels reached (Itzchak, Lahat, Burgin & Zachor, 2008) so the earlier in a child's life one looks for treatment and aids the better the future situation will be.
Than studying people on the autistic condition spectrum, this new study well defined subgroup of individuals within this range. The researchers examined the gene GABRB3, which regulates the functioning of a neurotransmitter called gamma- aminobutyric acid (GABA) contains several SNPs that vary across the
…show more content…
Some symptoms are Clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements, Fear of changes; sameness in daily routines can be very important for people routine and can help manage the anxiety of people. Lack of empathy, Problems with nonverbal communication Repetitive behavior or rituals, Socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior, Limited interest or preoccupation with a subject or interest can be obsessive as well as intense. Asperger’s have a lack in social interaction, they have poor communication and lack of imagination. Have trouble understanding other people’s feelings or talking about their own feeling, avoid eye contact may find it difficult to make and hold eye contact with people they are speaking to, want to be alone or want to interact, but not know how, speak in unusual ways or with and odd tone of voice seem nervous in large social group, have a hard time understanding body

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