Heathcliff's Animosity In Wuthering Heights

Decent Essays
People are complex beings, not only predictable, but at times also unpredictable; no one knows what someone might do. In Emily Bronte’s chilling novel Wuthering Heights, she has managed to create a character that suffers the consequences for the revenge he plots in the name of love, and for power over those who treated him as if he were worth nothing. Heathcliff’s evolution into a man who thrives on the destruction of other people’s happiness suffers along with those he destroys, creating a life of misery on the moors.
Disrupting another’s way of living causes immediate animosity. People do not like change, and Heathcliff causes just that in the Earnshaw’s home. Heathcliff, not only unwelcome, but described as the gypsy boy, does not help his case when it comes to the family accepting him, specifically Hindley. He views Heathcliff as an invalid. Hindley “hated him” to such a degree that at every chance he saw Heathcliff, he would find some way to abuse him either mentally or physically (Bronte 37). This animosity between Heathcliff and Hindley contributed to the hateful relationship that these two characters shared. Hindley goes out of his way to make Heathcliff suffer, feeding Heathcliff’s desire for one day exacting his revenge. Hindley tries to take one of the most important people out of Heathcliff’s life telling him
…show more content…
It never does well to dwell on the past because then life has a bitter meaning and no one would move forward. Heathcliff could never forgive those who treated him ill, and would not stop once he took his revenge out on Hindley. Revenge has no end and before he knew it Heathcliff was already an empty shell, only intent on being haunted by Catherine’s ghost. Vengeance seems like the only way to seek retribution in Heathcliff’s eyes, and that is what caused his demise in the

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    When Chillingworth places someone’s fate in his hands, he becomes delirious and is in a continuous state of hatred. While he “ma[kes] the very principle of his life to consist in the pursuit and systematic exercise of revenge” (177), he emanates atrocity as he is unable to completely achieve his goal from calamitous actions of devastation. Therefore, Chillingworth demonstrates the detrimental repercussions that developed from devoting his life to finding vengeance, as it dictates and inhibits his life, his passion, and his function in society to only serve as the epitome of…

    • 1059 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Because of this Othello slowly spirals out of control slowly brewing a hate for his onced loved wife and calling her “whore” and eventually ending her life. He did this because he was so wildly jealous that he couldn't even notice the facts right in front of him. He believed it so he looked hard enough to find something to support his argument. In Conclusion all these evils has the potential to be as bad as each other. Depending on the individual and his/her cause they become worse.…

    • 465 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    —Will you be ruled by me?” (4.7.56-58). With this quote showing Laertes to be in a dark time in his life, with his loved ones dead, Claudius steps in to take advantage of his desperation. His anger is the root of his gullibility, with him feeling that his duty as a son is in jeopardy. He is unable to recognize the deceitfulness of Claudius’s true plan and agrees whole heartedly to commit the sin. In addition, all these events cause him to act in a dishonorable manner.…

    • 1190 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    In the play Hamlet, William Shakespeare creates a character who is so consumed in his pain and drive for revenge that he ultimately ruins his own life and the lives of many around him. Despite the fact that revenge is self satisfactory, it can lead to the destruction of personal relationships, and can unintentionally harm others if pursued. Although pursuing revenge may provide temporary release of anger, there will be many repercussions. After the deed is committed, one will find that many relationships may be ruined. The strive for revenge can easily destruct connections with people; in fact, being consumed in the concept of revenge may push people away and create a sense of loneliness.…

    • 766 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    He is an individual that vigorously dislikes it when someone treats him unfairly. Notably, he seems to be infuriate about the rumours on how both Othello and Cassio have slept with his wife. During one of his soliloquies, he states, “For that I do suspect the lusty Moor / Hath leaped into my seat. The thought whereof / Doth, like a poisonous mineral, gnaw my inwards” (Act II.i.220-222). The only opinion that could possibly be made from this is that Iago hates it when someone completes a wrong deed against him.…

    • 1014 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Heathcliff seeks revenge on anyone for his or her previous actions towards him. This makes him a brutal and a melancholy character as a result of his destructive revenge. One can see this when Hindley seeks revenge on Heathcliff making him the character he is, and when Heathcliff seeks revenge on Hindley, Catherine, and Cathy. Hindley is the main reason why Heathcliff is so miserable throughout his life. Hindley gets his revenge on…

    • 1028 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Stanley’s vicious nature is caused by his own vulnerability which is resolved with such brute force; he is aggressive towards Blanche and everyone else who defies or intimidates him. Using Stanley’s character, Williams reveals that this primal instinct is originated by a sense of inferiority, thus humanizing these monster-like, violent types of men to assist those under such men to understand and adapt to them. Stanley’s savage, animal like description and tendency of relying on brute force to solve his problems reveals that deep down he feels inferior and threatened by others. Stanley has been feeling inferior, that there is proof of, since he met Stella, “STANLEY: When we first met, me and you, you thought I was common. How right you was, baby.…

    • 1508 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Reverend’s own actions sicken him further; Arthur Dimmesdale “loathed his miserable self” enough to subject himself to torture(137). He keeps himself awake with night vigils and “plied his own shoulders” with a scourge(141). HIs self-inflicted psychological abuse leads to the horrifying physical harm. Reverend Dimmesdale feels guilty and ashamed for his sin which results in a longing for retribution. He temporarily satisfies this reprisal by his private torments.…

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Mr. Chillingworth eventually learns of Dimmesdale’s sin and seeks revenge by torturing him with loneliness and guilt. This on top of Dimmesdale’s own remorse causes both he and Chillingworth to decline in health both physically and mentally. Hawthorn shows through the characters Arthur Dimmesdale and Rodger Chillingworth the theme of revenge destroying both the victim and the seeker. Rodger Chillingworth, whilst seeking his revenge, ultimately loses his humanity. Rodger Chillingworth, by focusing his energies solely on revenge seeking, loses his devotion to his passions that make him who he is.…

    • 1263 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Phonies are also people who are mature, who lack innocence and are hypocrites. Whenever he is around phonies, it kills him. For instance, "One of the biggest reasons [he] left Elkton Hills was because [he] was surrounded by phonies." (17). He hates them so much he does not want to be like them; he alienates himself from them.…

    • 1112 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays

Related Topics