The Common Themes Of Edgar Allan Poe

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Edgar Allan Poe is one of the most famous writers/poets of all time. When the name Poe comes to mind, most people think of his infamous tales of horror and mystery. His literary work reflects his troubled mind and the broken memories of his past. Poe is known as one of the most influential writers of the American Romanticism Period. Edgar Allan Poe was born on January 19, 1809 in Boston, Massachusetts. Poe is the son of two actors, David and Elizabeth Poe. He did not have a normal lifestyle because his father left the family, and his mother died when he was only three. After being separated from his siblings, Poe was taken in by the Allan 's, John and Frances. Edgar adapted to his new family well, only with one exception. He and Frances …show more content…
Each theme differed from story to story, but the three most common themes he wrote about were: death, obsession, and madness. For example in the short story, "The Premature Burial" a man obsesses over his burial and begins to lose his mind. In "The Pit and the Pendulum", a man is afraid of getting the death penalty and goes to great lengths to avoid a life-threatening event. This is shown through the following quote, "The sentence- the dread sentence of death was the last distinct accentuation which reached my ears"(Poe 9). Madness one of the themes in "The Raven". Throughout this story, the reader sees the man begin to lose his sanity because of the Raven 's ongoing torture. Many of these themes come from the feelings Poe had throughout his …show more content…
This was a literary, artistic, and intellectual movement that took place in the U.S. during the eighteenth century. It was a time when writers were thriving. Writers of this time included, Edgar Allan Poe, Henry Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. These writers brought a new sense of energy and creativity to literature. In short term, most writers were Transcendentalists. Authors like Emerson and Thoreau focused on topics such as politics, nature, and religion. Poe on the hand was considered a "Dark Romantic". According to the article, On Edgar Allan Poe by Marilynne Robinson, Dark Romantics such as Poe and Hawthorne, wrote more serious and dark stories as opposed to optimistic ones. Frightening symbols, horrific themes, and internal conflict were common topics in their stories. During the Romanticism period, creativity, emotion, and nature were components of most writing. For Poe, this was not the case. His life struggles and emotions were composed in his stories. Some readers were frightened by this, while others found it interesting. When Poe wrote, he gave readers a whole new perspective on life. Instead of writing about certain topics, Poe wanted his readers to be challenged, to figure out what was really going on with the characters in the

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