The Cause And Effects Of Eating Patterns And Habits

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Caroline Caldwell once said “In a society that profits from your self-doubt, liking yourself is a rebellious act.” A quote that’s powerful, yet more relevant than ever as eating disorders in the United States are on the rise. Research has proven that at least 30 million people nationwide suffer with some form of an eating disorder. (Mascarelli ) Eating disorders like anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorders are psychological disorders characterized by abnormal eating patterns and habits. The psychological obsession can lead sufferers to believe falsehoods regarding their body image, mainly justifications that cause them to feel that disordered eating is beneficiary. Cases of this dangerous epidemic have been around as early …show more content…
Our county is so ingrained with an “ideal” body image, that it has become nearly impossible to walk into a store without seeing “How to lose 10 lbs fast in 2 weeks” plastered on magazines or books. These kinds of messages are what cause people to turn to eating disorders. The very instant an individual develops these disorders, their body starts to experience the drastic toll of both long-term and short-term effects. In a case-study done by Dr. Michael Sidiropoulos, he describes these effects as affecting “..virtually every organ system. Common signs and symptoms include loss of subcutaneous fat tissue, orthostatic hypotension, bradycardia, impaired menstrual function, hair loss, and hypothermia.” (Sidiropoulos 3) The greatest concerns are the long-term effects Sidiropoulos cited from JG Johnson’s research article “Eating Disorders During Adolescence and the Risk for Physical and Mental Disorders During Early Adulthood.” The article explains that patients with eating disorders in adolescence are at a high risk for many medical complications that continue into adulthood (i.e. osteoporosis). Even after recovering from these disorders, patients in recovery can relapse and become symptomatic again (even over an extended period of time), as described in Dr. Lowe’s research (Long-term outcome of anorexia nervosa in a prospective 21-year follow-up study). Eating disorders take their toll on …show more content…
The reason the body is so adamant when it comes to change can be explained by the way that the neurotransmitters interact in the brain. Neurotransmitters are brain chemicals that communicate information throughout our brain and body. They relay neurons (signals between nerve cells) to tell the body to do things such as breathing, digesting food or moving a muscle. Normally when the body is hungry, the liver will detect this and send signals to the lateral hypothalamus that glucose levels are low. Consequently, the hypothalamus triggers whatever habits an individual has regarding food seeking and appetite. Scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Center have discovered that the brain of those with anorexia and bulimia can actually override the urge to eat in the

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