Strict Constructionists Dbq Analysis

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With respect to the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. To what extent was this characterization of the two parties accurate during the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison?

As war wages on in Europe, economic and political influence is spreading to America. As the President’s, Jefferson and Madison are challenged by upholding their country’s honor and putting their beliefs into action. However ideas change along with time and the Presidents may have to alter their beliefs to keep the nation stable. Although the administrations of President Thomas Jefferson and President James Madison attempted to stick to
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Federalists generally loosely viewed the constitution, and disregarded the need for smaller state legislatures. In document D, Daniel Webster criticizes Madison’s military policy, using the Constitution to prove his point that it is unconstitutional to draft men and children for militia. Webster altered his political views in order to bring opposition the Democrat Republicans. His speech solidifies the idea that parties change their views when they have power. Adding on to the reverse of political views, document E discussed the Hartford Convention, which was a meeting of the New England Federalists to debate on-going matters. The convention discussed removing the three-fifths compromise, requiring a two-thirds supermajority in Congress for the admission of new states, declarations of war, and laws restricting trade. The Hartford Convention was a complete reverse for the Federalist Party. In order to stop Democrat Republican rule, the Federalists resorted to becoming strict constructionists and discussing limiting the power of the federal government, a feat that they opposed altogether.
In conclusion, it is therefore evident that although the administrative of Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, both supposedly Republican, tried to maintain republican beliefs, rather the beliefs were led by Federalists such as Daniel Webster, as stated in his speech. The Democrat-Republicans had to adopt Federalist beliefs to "keep up with the times" defined in laws such as the Embargo Act, and the Louisiana Purchase. Vice versa, the Federalists had to adopt Republican stances to somewhat partially hold their power in the nation, holding conventions and authoring journals that eventually led to their

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