Mental Illness

Great Essays
There is an ever present negative stigma against those suffering from mental illnesses in

the world today. Even though around 1 in every 4 people, aged 18 or older, suffer from a

diagnosable mental illness, most of the population still view these people with distrust and even

worse, disgust. In order to stop this stigma we must first admit that there is one and see the full

extent of it. In doing this we find ways to address the problem and educate the population in

ways that will adapt their view.

Statement of the Problem

“Stigma tragically deprives people of their dignity and interferes with their full

participation in society.” (Satcher, 2000) said the surgeon general in 1999. What he means by

this is that stigma holds
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This takes a good portion of our society and puts them in an inaccessible state

where they cannot contribute many of the brilliant things they have to offer. Further presence

will also bring about discrimination in the workforce. Which is why research into the exact level

of stigma that is out there in each gender and ethnicity will help us find “...the mechanisms that

lead from stigmatization to harmful consequences.”(Link, 2004) and how to address them. There

is also the issue of many people avoiding health professionals through fear of a mental health

diagnoses caused by stigma and self-stigmas. This creates an issue of many people suffering in

silence. Many cultures have different views on mental illness, which is why another goal of this

research is to see how different demographics view mental illness, not usually tested in most

stigma research.

Purpose of the Study

The purpose of this study is to find the root of stigma by seeing what the exactly the

stigmas are and how intense they are in varying demographics.

Research
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A high overall percentage of people who believe mental illness is associated with

violence.

3. A majority of each population will hold a negative stigma/ stereotype towards those

who have a mental illness.

Method
Participants

The population must be broken up into different ethnicity groups first and then broken up

within those groups into gender, and lastly age. This method of sampling is called stratified

sampling in which a population is broken up into smaller groups with alike characteristics.

Another variation of this research could be done by further separating groups based on financial

status. For the purpose of this particular essay the population used will be from the U.S.A, but

other versions of this research could use populations from around the world to stand as a better

representation.

Research Design

The best possible way to conduct this study, which relies heavily on the population’s

personal views, is done through a survey. A survey allows for a direct question answer response

over the opinions people have towards mental illness. The survey will be administered through a

simple electronic survey which will ask a series of questions on a scale of one through

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