Stephen Hetherington's Self-Knowledge: Begging Philosophy Right Here And Now

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Bill ******
Professor Aaron *******
Philosophy 100

Creating Ourselves

So many questions loom when we think about how we are what we are. Do we all know what makes us…us? Are we just the shell for something inside to control us? Are we all driven by what our minds create us to do? As you keep reading, you will see this argument laid out by what Stephen Hetherington has written about in his book, Self-Knowledge: Begging Philosophy Right Here and Now.
Hetherington creates a few models as he thinks to himself about how he can find his inner self. One being the Self-Discovery conception. With the Self-Discovery concept, Hetherington feels that his identity is contained by a real self within him. He believes that his ideas and actions are created by a pre-existing core and that he is unable to change himself by how he thinks or what he does (Hetherington, 40.) One might think this is a more reasonable choice because they could believe that we are controlled by a soul, and our bodies are just the shell being operated
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So if you discover yourself by creating what needs to be discovered that contradicts the two models of Self-Discovery and Self-Creation. He has found his answer.
Let’s recap what Self-Creation and Self-Discovery are again. Self-Creation is the idea that you are nothing more than what your conscious believes you to be. Self-Discovery is the idea that you have something inside, past your conscious that controls you. Hetherington’s conclusion of saying that you discover yourself by creating what needs to be discovered says it all. You can’t make an argument for them to be separate if they both tie into each other. So yes, Hetherington is correct in believing they are contradicting each

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