Sociological Imagination And The Promise

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The Sociological Imagination by C. Wright Mills elaborates further on the concepts of sociological imagination and the promise of sociology. Mills writes detailed explanations on what these concepts mean and how they can relate to society. In society, the debate of whether people should be able to use whichever restroom they want disregarding their biological sex is an expanding issue. Many people advocate or fight against this social issue for many reasons. Judith Butler’s and Dorothy Smith’s feminist perspectives relate best to this social issue through the ways in which they touch on gender equality and inequality. Feminism contributes to the promise of sociology through gender equality as well as equality in many other aspects in society. …show more content…
Mills suggests that in order to conform to the promise of sociology, one must be able to understand specific history and biography and apply this by uncovering the connection between the two (Mills, 1959). Mills claims that the major role of a sociological scholar is to identify the difference between an individual’s personal issues and the widespread issues that may impact society in its entirety (Mills, 1959). Further, a sociological scholar must be able to combine these two areas of human experience into a working society that will benefit all members of society (Mills, 1959). Mills claims that majority of men and women during this time are inept of understanding the effects that sociological and cultural changes can have on their lives. He claims that men and women are inept to do this because he believes that average people are too involved with dull events. This is causing individuals to lack the quality of mind that is essential to understand the sociological and cultural changes and the relationship between these two things within the greater society (Mills, 1959). Mills indicates that the people who are aware of the promise of sociology have regularly been asked three sorts questions. The first sort of questions regards society and the different variables that make up society. Mills lists the first sort of questions that a person may reflect on: “What is the structure …show more content…
Firstly, people who argue against gender-neutral bathrooms suggest that this might be an excuse for a person of the opposite gender to inappropriately watch other people using the bathroom. For example, gender-neutral bathrooms might allow a man who identifies as a man to enter a bathroom and inappropriately watch a woman using the bathroom. Butler contradicts this argument by claiming that gender cannot be considered a role and that the individual does not choose to act that way. She argues that it is apart of the individual’s nature and they cannot control it. Butler claims that society views an individual gender through his or her different actions that he or she chooses to do. Therefore, a person should not be denied access to a bathroom that they feel they have a right to use it whether they identify as male or female. Secondly, people who argue against gender-neutral bathrooms suggest that gender-neutral bathrooms illustrate a lack of empathy towards men and woman who were victims of sexual assault or rape. For individuals who lived through such an experience may face some distress when exposed to the opposite gender in a bathroom. Butler contradicts this argument by claiming that individuals do not have to consciously think about what do when identifying as a male or female. When it comes to identifying as a male or female, the inclination to do so will

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