Self Harming Effects

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III. Self-harming Effects When a child experiences various forms of abuse, such as physical, psychological, sexual abuse or neglect, they are prone to have self-harming behavior once they reach young adulthood. The effects of child abuse or neglect can hinder proper development and socialization. This makes it difficult later on in life for children to handle their emotions. This usually leads to externalization of behavior or internalization of behavior. Studies suggest that boys are more likely to externalize and females are more likely to internalize their emotions. One method of dealing with the effects of adverse childhood experiences is self-harm.
Various types of child neglect can lead to serious self-harming behavior. Brandon,
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Collin, Daigneault, and Herbert reviewed multiple research articles that focused on child sexual abuse and the various effects it can have on a child. The research focused on four trauma causing factors, the first is traumatic sexualization, followed by betrayal, powerlessness and stigmatization. Child sexual abuse is known to cause many developmental programs in victims. The most common issues noted in the literature were post-traumatic stress, disassociation behavior, depression and inability to form healthy sexual relationships (Collin et al: 2013). Sexual abuse can be considered one of the worst forms of abuse that a child can experience based on the incredibly high amount of short term and long term effects that come with child sexual abuse. The long term effects are particularly concerning because they can negatively impact a child’s entire life. Collin discussed four ways in which a child reacts to child sexual abuse. In a small number of cases children show few symptoms and even less common is when a child does not show any symptoms of abuse. When a child does not externally or internally express their emotions it does not mean that the abuse they experienced was any less severe than someone who shows multiple symptoms of abuse. Their reaction to the abuse, or lack thereof, is accredited to that specific child’s resiliency and ability to cope with the situation. Most victims are …show more content…
Marshall, Galea, Wood, and Kerr conducted a study of 1,634 individuals aged 14 and older who reported injection drug use within the past six months. The study was longitudinal in nature, follow ups were conducted once every six months, over the course of 5 years. Over the five-year period 80 participants reported at least one suicide attempt. Those 80 individuals reported various forms of severe abuse including, sexual abuse 55.1%, physical abuse 40.2%, and emotional abuse 52.6%; however, in all categories of abuse at least 70% of individuals reported abuse whether it be low or moderate abuse (Marshall et al: 2013). When an individual experienced any form of abuse as a child, it greatly increased the likelihood of developing suicidal behavior. The severity of the abuse was also a strong indicator of whether or not an individual would develop suicidal tendencies. The researchers categorized severity of abuse in four sections ranging from, no abuse, low to moderate abuse, moderate to severe, and severe to extreme abuse. The more severe the abuse the more likely the individual is to attempt suicide. Those who reported severe to extreme levels of abuse made up a vast majority of those who attempted suicide during the five-year

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