Mao Zedong's Cultural Revolution

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From 1949 through 1976, Mao Zedong ruled China under a Communist form of government. Throughout Mao’s reign, a number disasterous military, economic, and social endeavors should have buried him politically. Some of these endeavors include China’s involvement in the Korean War, the Great Leap Forward, division of the Communist party, and relations with the Soviet Union and the United States. However, his popularity and role as the ultimate leader kept Mao in power, so much so as to spark the Cultural Revolution that left China in a state of chaos. Before top Communist party members began this era of civil strife and weak foreign affairs, Mao and his closest followers tried to reform Chinese industry and way of living.
After the Communist regime
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troops, led by Douglass MacArthur, edged closer to China (PRC), Mao and his cabinet issued warnings to the U.S., but ignoring these threats MacArthur surged forward. After MacArthur’s display of power, Mao decided to become involved in the war, aiming to prove the PRC’s military strength. As of October 1950, the PRC counterattacked the United States and Republic of Korea (ROK), driving their forces back to the 38th parallel by December of that same year. The war ended in an armistice between the ROK and DPRK, which is currently ongoing. The display of power from PRC prompted Mao to become confident and slowly cut off relations with the Soviet Union while starting relations with the United States over the next few …show more content…
Undoubtedly, Mao Zedong’s policies caused great famine and threw the middle and lower class into civil strife. The agricultural and industrial failures of the Great Leap Forward killed millions, while the Cultural Revolution pitted the people against themselves. Mao grew confidence through the Korean War and foreign negotions, but utterly failed in implementing policy that benefited his people. It can be said, however, that Mao brought his people and party together during the early years of his political life and the Long March. Without his guidance, the overthrow of the Nationalist Party would have been very unlikely. Unfortunately, poor decision after poor decision hurt the people of China most of

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