Gandhi: The Most Influential Leader Of The Twentieth Century

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Considered as one of the most influential leaders of the twentieth century together with Nelson Mandela, Adolf Hitler, Winston Churchill, Martin Luther King Jr., Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Vladimir Lenin and many other great leaders, Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, also known as Mahatma Ghandi, was a very famous political and spiritual leader in India, he was the one who accomplished the Indian independence which his nation hoped for such a long time. He was the one who lead the campaign of the passive resistance, which had a great impact over the world.
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, better known as Mahatma Gandhi, was born in Porbandar, Gujarat, located in the North West of India on the day 2nd October in 1896. Mahatma was born in a high
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On his way to home unfortunately the World War I broke out, so he decided to stay in England to help them. In 1919 Mahatma organized a campaign of passive resistance toward the Parliament’s passage of the Rowlatt Acts. The Rowlatt Acts gave the authorites the opportunity to stop any protesting activities. Mahatma called out his followers of the satyagraha campaign to perform peaceful protests and strikes. This resulted in the broke out of violence, in 1919 the Massacre of Amritsar happened, the British Brigadier General Reginald Byer fired out a gun machine and killed around 400 people and over 1000 people were injured. From this incident on Mahatma started advocating satyagraha so that their protest won’t get to the result of violence. His fame was arisen by the concept of peaceful protests and he was known as the “Great Soul” which is what gave him the name of Mahatma. By 1921 he was already leading the Indian National Congress and started to plan on the Swaraj, the complete independence from British. Different from some other rulers, Mahatma taught his follower to prove to British that they deserve the independence and not obtaining it by force nor violence. He once vowed o not take advantage from his opponents. By the way Indians started their non-violent protest, British tried …show more content…
But his retirement didn’t last long, five years later when the British viceroy said that India would be fighting together with England for World War II, without even asking India’s opinions. This British arrogance stimulated India’s wants for independence. The Prime Minister of Britain called Winston Chruchill didn’t want to lose India as a colony, they announced that India would be free after the World War II. Mahatma wasn’t satisfied with this response, he wanted it earlier, and so he organized another campaign in 1492 and called it “Quit India”, after this, British again arrested Mahatma. Mahatma was released in 1944 and he found out that there were a great disagreement between the Muslims and Hindus, tha majority of Indians were Hindus, so the Muslims feared to be dominated by them after obtaining the independence. Muslims wanted to govern the northwest of India since there was the place where more Muslims residents are found. Mahatma didn’t like the idea of splitting

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