Comparing The Charter Of Rights And Freedoms In Canada

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Does Canada comply with the right not to testify against oneself or confess guilt?
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms in Canada is a bill of rights that guarantees the rights and freedoms of Canadian citizens from the policies and and actions of all levels of government (the Charters). Section 7, 11, and 13 of the Charter protects guilty as well as innocent individuals when accused of a crime. It allows cizitens to remain silent and not testify against oneself during an interrogation process. The Charter provides protection to a person from being compelled to become a witness against themselves in a criminal case as well as making it difficult for the government to convict a person for an offence against the law. In Canada, it is the rule that
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The accused is given the right to remain silent before and during the trial which has been protected as a principle of fundamental justice in accordance with section 7 of the Charter. Skinnider and Gordon state that the right to silence is broken into two common law concepts: confessions rule and the privilage against self-incrimination (10). The confessions rule is obtained from the accused by the authorities which is considered not an appropriate evidence while the privilage against self-incrimination forestalls the accused from testifying against oneself.
Similarly, Martin considers the importance of having to differentiate between an accused person at their trial and a mere witness (164). The accused has the right not to be a compellable witness at their own trial nor answer to questions unless they voluntarily do so in court. Canada 's legal system protects witnesses while testifying as well as when choosing not to testify at all. The accused should voluntarily confess to their guilt on their own will so to remove any concern for the violation of the principle against self-incrimination and the
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However, over the years, the principle of self-incrimination became evident and more emphasised to raise awareness on the freedom of choice whether to confess or not before or during trial. Skinnider and Gordon state that the "principle aimed at protecting against the use of coercion by authorities in the conscription of the accused as a testimonial source" (10), which has been developed by the Canadian jurisprudence to protect Canadian citizens rights in court. Over the past couple of decades, the principle against self-incrimination and not having to be compelled to assist on one 's prosecution has been deeply rooted in Canada 's Legal system (Dufraimont 241).
The Charter provides protection for the accused despite having to voluntarily testify against oneself at an earlier proceedings that has been mentioned in section 13. Ratushny in his article has indicated how the Canadian Bill of Rights has had an effect on creating a right for the accused persons for testifying against oneself (76). Similar to Skinnider and Gordon article, Ratushny literature outlines the rules pertaining to an accused person who may never be forced by the Crown to be presented as a witness at their own

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