Revolution In British Colonial America

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George Washington told his troops, “These are the times, that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis shrink from the service of their country; but he that stand it NOW, deserve the love and thanks of man and woman.” which was a part of The Crisis by Thomas Paine. King George III had just been elected as the new King of Britain and later he elected people to help him, but the entire British government was not bright at all. King George III had to figure out how to keep peace between the Native Americans, and the settlers. He told the Native Americans to stay west of the line he “drew” down the Appalachian Mountains, and the settlers to stay to the east. Unfortunately, the settlers had already been crossing and going to the other side. Everything the British did was costly. Furthermore, they had to add more people to the British army. According to the British government, they had to maintain peace, so they expanded their army to about 7,500 men. Sadly, that was only one of their many problems, too. Britain had to pay a huge debt because of the French and Indian War. …show more content…
The Stamp Act, Quartering Act, and the Intolerable Acts made by the British government, upset and raged the colonists in many ways, which ultimately led and contributed to the revolution in British Colonial …show more content…
British taxation on the colonies angered the colonists. They would fight back and protest rather than pay the British. Every British attempt to control the colonists was met with resistance. The Intolerable acts led to people hiding from the British and the gathering of the 13 colonies in Philadelphia. The Boston Tea Party was another uprising caused by the British imposing their will upon the colonists. In the end, the colonists decided to rebel rather than obey the British, leading to the Revolutionary

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