Religion & Belief Systems in Australia Post 1945 Essay examples

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Religion & Belief Systems in Australia post 1945
Question 1:
Aboriginal religion is based on land. Land is the heart of Aboriginal Dreaming and provides the assurance needed for the continuation of rituals and ceremonies (king, 2010, p.213). The effect of Dispossession on Aboriginal spiritualities related to the separation from their land was enormous and overwhelmingly detrimental.
The impact of British colonisation resulted in Australia being declared 'terra-nullius' 'land belonging to no-one' and Aboriginal peoples were subject to policies of dispossession and protectionism in a bid to the eventual demise of all facets of their traditional culture. (http://www.bookrags.com/essay-2005/3/2/5583/41950, 2005) The policy of 'terra
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The Aboriginal land rights movement is a religio-political movement that seeks to secure the inherent rights of aboriginals to their land, and to ensure that their religious, spiritual and cultural integrity is preserved (king, 2010, p.213).
The importance of Mabo to the Aboriginal people was huge as it overturned the notion of “terra nullius” in establishing Native Title and therefore the Indigenous Australians have claimed native title based on the stories of the Dreaming, the location of totems and sacred sites, and the elders customary possession of the land. According to Patrick Dodson (source 1) he saw Mabo as an opportunity for all Australians to come to an understanding of their shared history and realign the distorted relationship and come together as “one shared nation”.
The Native Title Act that came into force on January 1 1994, established a National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Land fund for the purpose of enabling dispossessed Aboriginal people to acquire land which gave Aboriginals the right to

Question 1 continued: gain economic and social independence, thus enabling them to preserve their culture in a way that is deemed appropriate by them.
In December 1996, in another landmark judgement known as the Wik Decision, the high court determined that native title may coexist with pastoral leases, and that, where there is conflict between the two,

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