Relapse Prevention In Recovery

Improved Essays
Relapse does not have to be a part of the recovery process, but it is a reality that many will encounter. The necessity to hit a painful bottom has proven to be a very effective motivator toward a successful recovery. “when the pain of remaining the same becomes greater than the pain of changing, we will change” (Narcotics Anonymous, 1992, pg. 173). There is hope, as the substance user will discover, through the necessary treatment of change. Yet many do not understand relapse and are often left with shame, fear, and distorted perceptions of its ability to oppose positive change. Gorski (2003), states that relapse is not a conscious process and since many have not been taught how to identify and manage relapse warning signs the pain becomes …show more content…
In the process of obtaining healthy goals that surpass abstinence the client must develop a plan that incorporates an educational approach to relapse. Not every client is a carbon copy of another and there for must be approached with a degree of honest self-assessment in order to identify contextual differences that may affect the overall success of the client. Relapse prevention begins with the process of treatment as it is structured, the contextual changes presented in social structures, and the models used in relapse prevention.
Proper planning begins the process of change necessary for recovery, and addresses the expected deterioration of change many will experience. This plan cannot meet proper success without first stabilization found in abstinence from all mind-altering substances, in other words the time has come to take the reins back. Proper assessment can help both the client and therapist to see patterns of addictive behavior through a historical approach. Discovering triggers to addictive behavior, relapse history, and attempts of recovery can provide an extensive list of avoidable
…show more content…
The client’s commitment to recovery must be first met with abstinence in order for proper treatment to be rendered. Assessing individual patterns can establish proper points of focus and create a goal-oriented plan to change unhealthy behavior. Therapeutic approaches must be adaptive to the social, environmental, and cultural differences that may be present. Continued education of what high-risk, social, and belief systems that may trigger a relapse process can further habitual changes through continued practice. Understanding that addiction is a disease of isolation, a key change that is universal is the formation of community that supports continued recovery. Yet the individual must become efficient in regulating self, in hopes that that community will fill the role of support as recovery is an inside

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    Addiction is a chronic disease that can take hold quickly or develop over an extensive period of time. Dependence on drugs or alcohol is characterized by compulsive or uncontrollable urges to use despite any harmful consequences. Although the effects can be long lasting, recovery is achievable with the proper treatment. The best way to recover from an addiction is to build a new lifestyle where it is easier not to use drugs or alcohol. Effective treatment includes several steps that help addicts stop using, stay drug and alcohol free, and be productive in life (NIDA 2016).…

    • 907 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The foundation of DBT is promoting two opposing goals for an individual, change and acceptance. DBT therapy balances the individual’s desire to dispose of all painful experiences with a corresponding determination to accept life for what it is (Dimeff & Linehan, 2008). The concept of regulating emotions as in mindfulness therapy is the foundation of DBT (Hayes & Levin, 2012). When viewed through the perspective of DBT, mindfulness is utilized to assist individuals in the acceptance of their emotions. Mindfulness teaches individuals to acknowledge what they are feeling without using judgement.…

    • 488 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Disease Model Of Relapse

    • 1086 Words
    • 4 Pages

    One of the therapies is called Reality therapy where the client or addict is encouraged to develop more effective behaviors. This theory states that through problem solving the individual can see how a new approach can work they will voluntarily accept it. (Glassner 2015) The “choice theory” believes that the individual or addict responsible for their actions and they will find a path to improve themselves to break away from their addiction because of personal empowerment. There are not many other specific, “choice theory” programs for recovery and treatment. Since the people who believe in the “choice theory” believe that addicts can just decide whether or not they want to quit and can by choice give up all drugs and maintain abstinence, it is easy to see why there is such stigma against the addicts who just do not quit.…

    • 1086 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Integrating extinction, the researcher(s) can address certain behaviors that hinder/prevent growth and development. Certain factors can affect the study are measures that are integrated to help identify the efficacy for the research conducted. The procedural process is to minimize the factors (behaviors) that interfere with the research. Steps are needed to identify the behavior that occurs. Such as: identifying the behaviors not relevant to the study, methodologies used for the study, gather the data that provides a foundation regarding the study, of course the purpose for the behaviors not relevant, producing a plan of action to breakdown certain variables, decipher the data collected, and reviewing a pre-and post-test data analysis.…

    • 775 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The Harm-Reduction Model

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages

    In my opinion, these two strategies are very helpful, but if I had to choose which one I think is the most effective, I would choose the medical model. This model allows individuals to believe that they should not partake in substance abuse any longer, and even though one may relapse they are able to start fresh. Also, I personally believe that addiction is a…

    • 1063 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    First, it is important that a person that has an addiction receives proper treatment. For example I learned that treatment is necessary and important. Determination to end an addiction is an important step to recovery but determination alone cannot help someone quit their addiction. It is important that a person whom has an addiction of any kind become part of any treatment to help them recover with their addiction. I use to think that someone could quit their addiction if they were determined to do it without any help.…

    • 1138 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The level of commitment to abstinence at treatment end predicts sustained abstinence, a requirement for recovery (Laudet & Stanick, 2010). Abstinence is the best way to avoid drug addiction. According to Hart & Ksir (2011), a person who comprehends the information about drugs will often be more able to make decisions about personal drug use. They will have an understanding of other drug abusers, and be better…

    • 1669 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Also, the harm reduction programs deal with all drug abuse situations the same way, compared to abstinence programs where every situation is seen in various ways and all treated depending on what form the disease is in and how far gone the person is. Abstinence-based treatment overall, wants to have its patients treated within a natural path; that includes having a possible relapse, and then returning to being abstinence, and returning back to their normal lives. The process is very rigorous and demands a person to be fully aware of their situation and willing to help themselves; before anything can be done to help the addict. Harm reduction overall, wants to have its patients be happy, and go through this process knowing that they be successful. It also, works to help prevent the spread of diseases through the use of drugs.…

    • 1256 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Their perspective is trying to contain the problem or the drugs and/or alcohol. This model takes all the important factors into consideration and see how these factors interact with each other. Their emphasis is on the overall health of the public. They look to prevent and intervene when they see a threat. They will try to teach children refusal skills to stop them from using as they grow older and this is considered a preventative strategy.…

    • 811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    These roles include the user, enabler, hero, scapegoat, lost child, and the mascot, but it is possible to create new and healthy recovery roles. Recovery promotes moving away from the control, manipulation, and selfishness addiction breathes into you and to move forward and create reciprocal relationships; starting first with God. Give Him your will and He will give you much more in return. When you start and maintain a cycle of reciprocity then everyone becomes more likable, and that is a major key to long-term relationships. Addiction is a killer of likability, but trust is part of the foundation of recovery that can rebuild destroyed relationships.…

    • 1371 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays