Indigenous Language Teaching

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INTRODUCTION

The purpose of the first part of this report critically reflects on the understandings in Indigenous Education that have been gained from unit topics. The report acknowledges that Standard Australian English is a second language for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students, that attitudes need to change both of teachers and of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and parents, and the need for schools to adopt a culturally supportive framework. In addition best practice examples are discussed from the Strong and Smart documentary and three AITSIL Professional Standard mini viewings. The second part of the report discusses best practices, teaching and learning strategies and resources that could be applied to Visual
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173). Attitudes affect the way you react, speak and treat the people within your environment. Therefore it is vital that teachers be respectful and mindful of others cultures within the classroom. By exploring and discussing relevant resources teachers are able to build their knowledge and confidence when teaching Aboriginal perspectives (2.4 Highly accomplished selecting indigenous resources). Teachers “attitudes will then govern how students relate to the speakers of languages and dialects other than Standard Australian English” (Harrison & Sellwood, 2016, p. 174). This will also encourage positive attitudes within the school. Therefore it is necessary for critically reflecting upon and modifying teaching practices to improve literacy levels and outcomes as highlighted by Rose (cited in Harrison & Sellwood, 2016, p. 141) as an issue of paramount importance for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders. Whilst acknowledgment is given to sporadic school attendance and that English is often a second language for these students, a focus is then directed to “difficulties outside the school” (Harrison & Sellwood, 2015, p. 141) rather than the impetus on teachers. Rose ((2010) as cited in Harrison & Sellwood, 2016, p. 141) argues that “we must look at our own practices in the classroom, and how we can change our practices to meet our Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander students’

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