Karma In Hinduism

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Hinduism

Hinduism is the oldest written religious system, a combination of religious paths. This combination makes Hinduism very diverse, always changing, and growing. Hinduism has various teachings, scriptures, and words to describe how everything in the universe is connected. A few of these teachings are karma, samsara, Brahman, Atman, and Moksha. The most basic and most common of these teachings is Karma (kamma). When I think of karma the first thing that comes to mind is someone saying “karma will get you back”. What is karma? In Hinduism “karma” are our actions and how these actions effect the world around you. Not only does karma effect this life but future lives. This brings us to the Hinduism believe of samsara. Samsara is the cycle
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Samsara depends on karma to determine how one’s Atman will continue in the universe. Brahman is this breath, connected energy that is all around us, making us one with the universe. Brahman is the ultimate principle in Hinduism, the breath behind all that exist. I interpret this to be the connective energy everywhere to everything that exist, has ever existed, and will ever exist. The universal breath that connects one’s Atman to both the living and nonliving. The rishis view Brahman as the unknowable, the unseen. The unseen energy or breath that surrounds everything, connecting and unifying absolute reality and relative manifestations. Brahman is the unification of everything, the basic foundation of all Hindu teachings. The ultimate goal in Hindu teaching is Moksha. Moksha is the liberation of the soul from illusion and suffering. Freedom of one’s Atman from Samsara is Moksha. Once this is obtained it is the end of all other goals of life. I see this teaching to be a transcendence from the physical form, the separation of Atman from Samsara (the cycle of life, death, and rebirth), becoming one with Brahman (universal breath), through Moksha (materialistic liberation). This is only possible for those who have perfected karma over a multitude …show more content…
As I have already stated Hinduism is an understanding of the universe and the connection of all matter both living and nonliving. One of the most spiritual and recognizable teacher/priest/prophet is Buddha. The Buddha is considered an avatar, the incarnation of previous gods in Hinduism. Buddha helps with the interpretation of present, past, and future teaching. His/she is an ultimate spiritual leader in Hinduism. The main teachings of Buddha is oneness, openness, and consecutiveness. The universe and everything in it is “one” in the same, no beginning or end. The Hindu scripture Bhaktivedanta VedaBase: Bhagavad-gita As It Is: teaches us that everyone has a place in the universe. We should respect each other and their position in the world. One should not think badly of themselves for doing what they have been taught and trained to do in this world. In this scripture Arjuna, a warrior ask for help understanding what he should do; go into battle and kill or not. Krishna a spiritual leader such as the Buddha, teaches Arjuna the importance of his calling as a warrior. Krishna teaches Arjuna about Samsara the cycle of life. Even though Arjuna is to battle he cannot kill that which is ever reborn. The Hindu scripture Chandogya Upanishad; “You Are That” teaches us that physical and nonphysical matter, living and nonliving are the same. Clay, gold, iron, all things “differ only in name

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