Reason: Why Did Chartist Fail?

Improved Essays
Essay 1
Title: Why did Chartism fail?
Word count: 1,412

Why did Chartism fail?
Language of class
At the time of the industrial revolution British society was completely restructured; economic, social and cultural changes leading to the chartist movement’s fight for political change. Historically, the term ‘Chartist’ has been used to refer to the political pressure group. To assess failure, we must first look at aims of the chartist movement. The Six Points of the People's Charter was the foundation of Chartist beliefs and aspirations. These aims encompassed universal suffrage for men using a secret ballot system. Allowing representatives that weren’t part of the property owning middle class or aristocracy to become MPs by getting rid of property
…show more content…
Some chartist to go further outside the agreed upon charter for example improving education and working conditions. One of the main reasons the Chartists failed was because they were divided in their methods. William Lovett, Francis Place and Thomas Attwood all believed in peaceful protest; they rejected violet methods. On the other side, were two members Fergus O’Connor and John Frost who believed violence would have to be used if the wanted to catch the attention of the upper classes and get their demands met by the rich and powerful men who controlled parliament. At the beginning chartist bought petitions to parliament a diplomatic method. In July 1839 they bought their first petition had 1.2 million signatures on it. Unfortunately, a large majority of Parliament rejected it by 235 votes to 46. Frost responded with violence leading the Newport Rising of 1000 armed people with clubs. The tragic results of the soldiers opening fire on citizens lead to the death of 22 men were leaving a further 50 were injured. The rest of the supporters fled. All the support they were steadily gathering for the last few years was lost. Many were repelled by the danger of losing their jobs or even possibly their lives were too great a …show more content…
They faced a massive consequence as they lost a lot of public support, and the support of their founding members as they tried to distance themselves from the chaos. People became fearful of thee violence associated with charism they were too scared to get involved by showing support for the Chartists. If they had not participated in violent acts, they may have had more supporters but instead they lost William Lovett who was disgusted by the killings of so many as a repercussion for attempting violence against the state, dividing the chartist effort and weaken in their progression. The middle class especially were fearful of this behaviour as it showed massive disruption to society and threat to the status quo. The chartist was made up of both middle and working-class people so there were many clashes of perspective. The Chartists did not all belong to the same class and this meant that many middle-class supporters withdrew as signs of violence appeared. The movement was greatly affected by this and began showing signs of failure to as middle-class members left was less money to fund chartist

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    With about twenty-five million people dead the European population decreased dramatically. The black death killed more people than any war or disease ever did up until that time. This outbreak has impacted family life, economy, and the church big…

    • 1886 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    ‘Government policies were the most important reason for the failure of the radical challenge in the period 1812 to 22’. How far do you agree? – Ismael Ulluso Government policies were the most important reason for the failure of the radical challenge in the period 1812 to 22. This failure was achieved through the introduction of laws and legislation such as The Six Acts. Mike Wells says, “It was difficult to meet both because government legislation barred ‘seditious meetings’ and the strong- minded radicals did not work easily together.” *.…

    • 771 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Karl Marx Hypocrisy

    • 2141 Words
    • 9 Pages

    For Marx, property is the source of class distinction and, therefore, inequality in society (Marx, 162). Due to Marx's belief in DM, he urges the proletariat to hastily "sweep away by force the old conditions of production" and thereby "sweep away the conditions for the existence of class antagonisms" (Marx, 176). Only once the proletariat have lead their revolution against the modern bourgeoisie can true freedom and equality be achieved. They must serve as the antithesis to the bourgeoisie thesis, resulting in the final Communist synthesis. Marx's prescription for society's woes fundamentally differs from that of the ET; the linear progress of enlightenment, aided and abetted by reason, is abandoned for the looping roller-coaster of DM3.…

    • 2141 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    They also opposed the Sedition Act because it demonstrated “the political welfare swallowed up in a continual grasp for power” (Matthew Lyon 283). The Federalists were mainly elitists, and cared more about making money and power than about the working class. There was a disconnect between the two groups, and the Sedition Act only proved that further. The act was specifically negative for the working class and agriculturalists that generally did not agree with the Federalists. They legally could not fight back against policies that benefited the elite but hurt them, as their freedom of speech was unlawfully taken away.…

    • 1033 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    But big business still felt this was too threating and opposed it. Workers were extremely fed up and took matters into their own hands. As seen before labor strikes and riots soon broke out in response to lack of government support. These strikes were quite threating because they would show that general strikes were possible. The government feared general strikes.…

    • 838 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The American Revolution was fought to escape the hand of an overpowering monarch. Many Democratic - Republicans were afraid of a powerful federal government because they did not want to be at the mercy of a monarchy again. Jefferson deemed the country too large for a single government, and also believed that a single government would lead to corruption. In general, the federal government was oppressive in his opinion, and it gained power at the expense of the people. Jefferson wanted states to be independent within themselves, but united when dealing with foreign affairs.…

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He wanted less government involved in businesses, so he decided to bring back competition and have an antitrust to separate the big businesses into smaller less powerful ones. Wilson thought that the tariff was too high and that it was corrupting Americans of their pay and their working conditions so he wanted to lower the tariff and bring competition back to fix low wages and working conditions. Wilson also felt like America was stuck in a cycle when it came to government. He wanted people to vote for who they wanted not for a political party. To…

    • 1770 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The government attempted to stop the spread by encouraging people to lock themselves up and avoid any victims who were infected, and it works except it also resulted in orphaned children, divorces and abandonment. The government continued to give the people wrong recommendations nut the truth is, the government is as lost as the people themselves. The Black Death overall was one of the most dreadful events occurred in history. It splits up families, the people and religions. Many deaths as the result of the deadly…

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Syria’s Civil War has created one of the worst humanitarian crises of the 21st century. What started as peaceful anti-government protests in early 2011 has escalated into a full-scale civil war. Half of the country’s population—more than 11 million people—have been killed or forced to flee their homes as a result (Asare, Patrick, Gritten, Offer, & Rodgers). As forces loyal to Syrian ruling Dictator Bashar al-Assad, those opposed to his regime, and jihadist militants from the Islamic State (also known as ISIS) clash, innocent civilians impacted by the war are scrambling to find sanctuary. Majority of Syrian civilians lost their livelihoods and economic opportunities, due to the devastation of war and the resulting destruction.…

    • 1253 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Its unfortunate how so many individuals suffer from mental illness but go on without proper care. On December 14, 2012 Adam Lanza opened fire at Sandy Hook Elementary killing twenty first grade students and six adults then him. Investigations conducted found out that he had suffered from mental illness and was obsessed with mass shootings. He had done plenty of research on mass shootings but in particular the Columbine High School massacre. Even though Adam suffered from mental illness, he refused to take medications.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays