Ray Bradbury Portrays Technology And Society In Fahrenheit 451

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How Ray Bradbury Portrays Technology and Society In Fahrenheit 451
Technology and society are drastically changed for the worse the more society evolves. In Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, people are banned from reading and owning books. Those found with books will get sent to an asylum and the books will burn. The government tries to kill all originality and personality while trying to form a utopia. Not only that, but they create artificial happiness so that nobody knows sadness. Since they create artificial happiness the government receives little opposition, and all remaining opposition they eliminate. In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury criticises the changing world around him. Bradbury alludes to the fact that society is detached from one another and that people no longer possess the same emotions and sympathy. Bradbury also states that technology oppresses society, and harms the community; yet they do not care.
Bradbury tries to say that society is detached from one another, and people no longer care about anything but themselves. People are less involved in each others lives and many lack emotion. In the book the reader can see that people no longer care about one another, or contain many feelings. Bradbury wrote, “They would have killed me,
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He shows that technology plays a role in making society cold and unfeeling towards one another. Technology holds people back and nobody seems to care, even though it is disastrous for society. Society became a place where people no longer care, people undervalue relationships, people do not interact, and the government controls people. Also in this society technology took over. Technology hypnotizes people, makes them completely change their way of thinking and their lives, and the government uses it to keep people confined and restrained. If society is not careful the world could become like that of 451; people might become distant and technology could

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