Post Racial Racism Analysis

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Having considered how the judicial system isn’t exactly fair in their treatment of races that are non-white, the statistics that are present is not surprising. When examing the statistics one can see how it can align with the belief of mass incarceration and racial inequality. The statistics are clearly represented by the author of the article “Post-Racial Racism: Racial Stratification and Mass Incarceration in the Age of Obama”, Ian F. Haney Lopez who claims that race in the United States functions as a form of social stratification. The United States has seen an unprecedented rise in the number of those who are incarcerated, then ever before. Not only that, but we also have more individuals incarcerated than any other country in the world. …show more content…
This is due to the fact that, according to Lopez “crime rates peaked in 1981 at around six incidents per hundred inhabitants, and then fluctuated at lower levels before starting a steady slide down to about four incidents per hundred persons by 2002”(Lopez, 10). Yet we still witnessed a rise in incarceration that was more than anything that was seen in 1981. Similarly, an article by Marc Mauer, “Addressing Racial Disparities in Incarceration” covers how mass incarceration impacts communities that are of color. Marc mentions that “As of 2005, national data indicate that White, Black, and Hispanic drivers were stopped by police at similar rates. But of those drivers who were stopped, African American motorists were more than 2.5 times as likely as Whites to be searched by police and Hispanics more than double the rate” (Mauer, 91). The police enforcement has had a history of showing bias and violence towards those that didn’t fit their perceptions. As a result, minorities will go through various degrees of harassment, regardless of how petty the crime may …show more content…
The consequence of being wrongly and unfairly incarcerated can have a huge negative impact for Africans .There are certain social stigmas that are appointed towards inmates. As pointed out earlier, the “New Jim Crow” makes it difficult for inmates to make and progress, due to the lack of opportunities. It’s particularly tough for Africans to find housing, work, and support after you are released. Notably, there is an unequal To illustrate this specifically, we can examine the article by Christopher J. Lyons, Becky Pettit, from the University of New Mexico and the University of Washington, respectively. Their article “Compounded Disadvantage: Race, Incarceration, and Wage Growth” examines “how the experience of incarceration affects wage trajectories for black and white ex-inmates”. In other words, it will look at whether black and white inmates are treated differently with regard to pay and labor market. They discovered that “the confirmation of racial stereotypes may encourage discrimination in the hiring process” (Lyons/Pettit, 260). African Americans inmates are going to fit into most racial stereotypes making it much more difficult for them to pass the hiring process. Whereas those who are white aren’t labelled as much because there is no need to racially profile them unlike with blacks. In addition to that, the authors also mention how those who were white and had a prior felony were

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