Psychological Flexibility Study

Superior Essays
Parenting Style and Development of Psychological Flexibility
Problem
Changes to parenting style greatly affect a child’s psychological flexibility throughout the course of their development. In order to become healthy and proactive citizens, children need to develop skills that aid them in achieving their goals in a diverse and inconsistent environment. Psychological flexibility is a set of dynamic processes that describes a pattern of interacting with the environment. Processes include mindfulness, adaptation to demands, ability to shift perspective, balance needs, and maintain appropriate behavior to pursue goals. The definition of psychological flexibility aligns with those of self- control, emotion regulation, and self -regulation. The
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A portion of the students were from other faiths. The participants were drawn from a large area with a diverse cultural and socio-economic mix. (Williams et al, 2012) Researchers visited the schools to administer the AFQ-Y (Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth) that measures psychological flexibility as well as a modified PAQ (Parental Authority Questionnaire that assess typology of parenting styles. The students completed the questionnaires without discussion. A unique code was created for each student to enable matching of data across the years. (Williams et al., 2012) An example of questions asked were: “I stop doing things that are important to me whenever I feel bad”, and “My mother does not let me question her decisions”. (Williams et al, 2012) The researchers used a multilevel model of change or growth curve modeling to analyze the collected longitudinal data. A total of 259 students completed the six-year study to provide necessary research …show more content…
Since the study went from 749 participants in the beginning to the final count at the end of the six-year period, it shows two of the cons listed for this type of study with the dropout affect and length of study. (Hart, 2016) The study also dealt with the relationships between parent and child and how predominant parenting styles mentioned in our textbook affect childhood development. Children raised in authoritative household tend to be well self-regulated and self-confident in their abilities and more resistant to psychological dysfunction. Whereas, children raised in authoritarian households are more anxious and withdrawn and prone to lack self-confidence. (Hart,

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