Possible Solutions To The Great Depression

1004 Words 5 Pages
The Great Depression was the continuous struggle of America to survive living in poverty from October 29, 1929 to 1939. This was triggered by the stock market crashing, but was mainly caused by the downfall of industries and agriculture. For industries, automobiles replaced railroads, fewer home were built, coal lost 50% to hydroelectric, natural gas and oil, and glass, lumber and concrete were tied to construction. For agriculture, farmers overproduced during WWI, so the prices of their products dropped. This led negligent farmers to pull out the crops and plants from their land which eventually caused the Dust Bowl where winds blew the left over dirt during a drought. Herbert Hoover was the president at the start of the Great Depression. …show more content…
For example, the National Youth Administration gave jobs to young people, but the government lost more money. Ultimately, fewer workers will get hired because of having too many recruits. This job program lowered the unemployment rate; however, it made the deficit rise and caused a greater debt. Moreover, the Fair Labor Standards Act only led to more complaining and less improving. The law included minimum wage, maximum hours, and child labor laws. Nonetheless, it limited the growth of businesses and the economy. Furthermore, the Works Progress Administration hurt America’s progress instead of advancing it. The program helped the unskilled and allowed them to do public work projects. But still, children should not be in a situation where they are forced to work and the meals provided only made the government deficit grow. Therefore, all of the acts have life-changing pros, but the cons overcome them due to the long-term effect of more …show more content…
According to Document 1, families and teenagers were served by the new laws proposed by Roosevelt. Family incomes boosted and the teenagers were able to find jobs and help support their families. The President solved the problem of households not having enough money or else a lot of people would have lost their homes. Based on the information from Document 5, the table and graph include data regarding the percentage of unemployed labor force. The unemployment rate went from around 20.6% in 1933 to only 9.5% in 1940. Thanks to the job programs by Roosevelt, about 90% to found work and could make money to support their families. In addition, Document 8 proves that the Social Security Act was actually beneficial to many citizens. The program helped children, the disabled and many others by welfare programs, lunches, and monthly pensions to the retired. This law gave Americans hope that the Great Depression was going to come to an end soon because the New Deal has helped so many. In conclusion, many aspects of the New Deal were

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