Post War Japanese Literature Essay

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Have you ever wondered what the literacy was like in Japan after World War II? How it affected their life and culture? Well, here you’ll find out the impact of writing in Post-War Japan. After the war, literature in Japan was basically on the ground, it was dead. Many authors were pressured to write and support war, and supposedly was successful for military. Various authors did not get a chance to publish their books, since they were not supporting war, or did not fit the theme of violence. “Writers with backlogs unpublished works were the first to benefit when wartime restrictions ended.” (Article) Lots of stories during, or after war were dedicated to how Japanese people were affected by the bombs thrown at them. The books written were expressing …show more content…
Most of their books now, and then still talk about their own lives. So, there really was no major plot twist or something that made people after war and now say “Woah! That is controversial, this is a new era for us, …show more content…
In a few words it was a time where most authors were writing about their experience after war. The story before and after, their feelings, their thoughts, where they ended up after the chaos was over. The presence of the disaster basically ruled their literature. In a few words this paper talked about the meaning of the era, what it meant, the purpose, and the background of it. The goal of this essay was to help someone and myself understand the meaning behind Japanese literature after World War 2. In conclusion, I talked about the background, impact, and authors of this

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