ASD Interventions

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Mohammadzaheri, Koegel, Rezaei, and Enayotolah 2015), recruited 30 elementary school children, between the ages of 6 and 11 years old, with a diagnosis of ASD, for their study studied. The participants in the study consisted of 18 males and 12 females. This study compared two interventions, to evaluate which would have a larger effect on disruptive behavior in children in public schools. The two interventions were, Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). The main difference between these two interventions is, PRT allowed children to choose their rewards based on their behavior. Whereas in ABA, the teachers chose the children’s rewards. The intervention took place during summer school, and lasted three months. …show more content…
(2014). Human supports play a major role for positive outcomes in treatment with autistic children. For the child to receive the most out of treatment they must have willing supports behind them to encourage them to continue to show improvements. The education of other team members and parents alike, on different techniques which might help the child is imperative (Herbert et al. 2014). Case-Smith and Arbesman (2008), wrote about the importance of parent/child interaction both in the home setting and at therapy. However, the parent must know how to appropriately play with their autistic child. A therapist must encourage the parent to correctly interact with their child by showing them how to intensely play with the child. During the parent/child play session, the parent should encourage the child to participate in problem solving, and pretend play. To provide the child with all of the skills necessary, the therapist can collaborate with the parent to provide guidance on how to help the child learn and grow through play. Children who receive regular treatment have proved to score higher on the Goal Assessment Scales (GAS). A good score on the GAS might indicate the child would need less assistance in some areas of occupation (Schaaf et al. 2014). Due to the need for less assistants, therapists can communicate with the parents of the child to discuss areas where the child will need more assistance. It is …show more content…
Children often are not aware of how exactly to manage their behavior, and parents and teachers generally do not know how to react to their children (Vivanti and Dissanayake, 2016). Interventions in the classroom can be beneficial towards any individual interacting with children with autism spectrum disorder, including the child (Deckers, Muris, Roelofs, and Arntz, 2016). Some interventions are completed in groups, others are done individually. Throughout these research articles, any interventions completed in groups with a comparison to other groups had no significant difference between the participants in each

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