Analysis Of The Pilgrimage Of Grace

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The Pilgrimage of Grace which occurred from October 1536 to February 1537 was a march hosted by protesters opposed to a series of measures set in place by Thomas Cromwell, King Henry VIII’s Lord High Chancellor, shortly after the Act of Supremacy was in place. The Act of Supremacy declared that King Henry VIII was supreme ruler over the Church of England These measures included new taxes, the disbanding of monasteries, land owned by the Catholic church was seized, and the amount of power King Henry possessed, expanded. Consequently, these new implementations outraged Catholics who were already fighting to stop the spread of Protestantism because of the Act of Supremacy. The participants in the Pilgrimage of Grace were determined to purify the …show more content…
In documents 1 and 6, we can see that their goal is clear. The marchers didn’t want a new King, just for him to exile his “evil counselors” which gives us a glance at the protester’s, negative, opinions of Thomas Cromwell. The King’s Council showed favoritism towards Protestants by taking away church land from Catholics and dissolving monasteries, meaning the Catholics would have nowhere to practice reverently, but this is because the King’s Council didn’t want a Catholic population dominating England. The participants in the Pilgrimage of Grace wanted to stop being persecuted, as seen in Document 4, which couldn’t be accomplished without the removal of Cromwell. Document 6 addresses this same topic by saying that king Henry should accept all published petitions to exile Cromwell and associates.

The participants in the Pilgrimage of Grace were concerned about suffering consequences for their marches and protests against the king and his staff. In Document 8, Nicholas Leche, a Catholic priest, writes that the king had an opportunity to tell the people what they were doing was considered treason and continues to defend the marchers that what they were doing was in the name of the king. He wrote this while he was in prison so he is hoping others won’t be placed in prison as well and wrote the document to convince the king what they were doing wasn’t wrong because it was for

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