Pennenberg's Response To Secular Western Culture

Decent Essays
Pennenberg’s response to secular western culture is presented in what he believe are the causes of the effects of secularism. His premise is build up around the loss of legitimacy in the institutional ordering of society. Pennenberg contends that without a belief in the divine origin of the world there is no foundation for order. I believe what he is conveying is that secularism alienate us from religion. He feel that religious wars and destruction of social peace prompted the historical processes of secularization. This is how politics becomes the exercising of power and people submit to that power. The breakdown of the universal validity of traditional principles and mindfulness of law is another characteristic of the lasting effects of secularization.

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