Patriot's History Summary

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Zinn states that the expansion of the United States wouldn’t have been able to happen without the mistreatment and cruel acts toward the Native American population. Zinn discusses how America often glances over the fact that thousands of Natives were removed and views western expansion as an all around positive event. The truth behind it is many Natives were killed or forcefully removed from their native lands due to Americans. Zinn mentions American presidents such as Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson to bring light into their involvement and mistreatment of the Native population. During Jackson’s presidency many saw him as a hero and thanked him for their economic and political growth. However, Zinn states that it was a terrible time for …show more content…
They say that there were positive social changes in relationships, health, prisons, education, and the status of women and African American slaves. In addition, they say interest grew for communalism, vegetarianism, temperance, prison reform, public schools, feminism, and abolition during Jacksonian reform movement. Another reason they say the Jacksonian presidency was so great was because the Second Great Awakening took place during the period. During this time the Protestant movement not only brought religious reform but it gave minority groups more rights and freedoms. Preachers often gave sermons telling people to remove sin from their life such as alcohol and prostitution, making America, morally, a better place. Lastly, the authors discuss how the Manifest Destiny and large land expansion of America was destined and turned out to be great for the country. They mention an envision of having a expanded country with natives being civilized and taught the culture of Americans to live harmoniously together. Overall, the authors convey that during the Jacksonian presidency, America benefited greatly from social reform to land …show more content…
Zinn understands and agrees that there were good things to come out of the Jacksonian Period such as social reform and land expansion but he doesn't avoid the fact that America only prospered at the cost of Natives. He strengthens his argument by that thousands of Natives were forcefully moved or killed and even mentions that the nations were willinging to live with the Americans yet they were still removed. On the other hand A Patriot's History makes an attempt at an arguement but fails because it tries to hide the existence and removal of Native Americans. The authors seemingly try to trick the reader into believing that nothing but good things came during the Jackson Presidency and list a litany of reasons why it was so good, such as education and health. However, their attempt at trying to hide the unjust treat of Natives is clear and disappointing. The only mention of natives was on page 17 when the authors wrote that they envisioned “natives who could be civilized and acculturated to the Empire of Liberty.” Other than this there were no mention of natives in their article. To make things worse, the decision of living with the Natives was never even considered by the US government at the time. Overall, Patriot's History comes close to a compelling argument since there were good things to come from the Jacksonian Presidency such as social reform from the Second Great Awakening, but

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