Olympe De Gouges The Rights Of Woman Analysis

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2. Revolution Throughout history, numerous people have started revolutions in many ways by displaying progressive ideas and fighting for the liberal changes in their society.
One such example is Olympe de Gouges, who courageously advocated for the rights of women in her writing “The Rights of Woman”. During Gouges’ time, women were living by social standards that made them inferior to men. In hopes of influencing the public with her notions and showing support for the females, Gouges, despite being too radical for her period, changed the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen to support the rights of both genders. As a progressive woman, Gouges was appalled at the inequality in her surroundings as she believed that a
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In any criminal cases, women had always been given gentler penalties. In “The Rights of Woman,” Gouges proposed that “any woman being declared guilty, all severity is exercised by the law”(Gouges 25) — a woman should be punished with the same standards as men. If society continued to provide women with lenient punishments, it further emphasized that women are not strong figures capable of strict punishments, which Gouges refuse to accept. In her view, females should be able to accept and handle the consequences of their wrongdoings. Essentially, Gouges resisted the traditional treatment of women in society by displaying her progressive views through her …show more content…
Instead of schooling, these slaves were forced into back-breaking labor work. However, Equiano, a previous slave, obtained his education despite the fact the many Europeans deemed it unacceptable for an African. With his autobiography, he wanted to inform the audience of his own struggles and his moving journey to becoming well-educated in a white-dominated society: “there are few events in my life, which have not happened to many” (Equiano 77). He displayed himself as living proof of a “civilized” African person who can read and write. By writing his own powerful narrative, he displayed the capabilities of an African. In addition, he told his European readers that despite different skin colors, Africans are human beings. Slaves should not have to face bigotry because they are not familiar with European culture. He wants to “compel them [the whites] to acknowledge that understanding is not confined to feature and color” (Equiano 86). It is the fault of the whites to disregard the idea that they were once uncivilized like the

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