Mcmurphy In The Film, One Flew Over The Cuckoo

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The movie mainly portrayed how different members of the society viewed those with mental illnesses. Those who controlled the ward, Nurse Ratched and her coworkers, believed they had the best interest of the patients in mind; however, their actions spoke otherwise. They have just conformed to society by treating the patients in the ward as damaged and declaring them unable to live amongst “normal” people. The patients in the ward may have had a chance if not for Nurse Ratched, who lowered their confidence and constantly reminded them of their conditions. The ward was a routinely dull environment with medications and therapy sessions periodically organized and any means of entertainment being strictly managed. This all changed with the arrival of McMurphy.
McMurphy was an extrovert and an unprejudiced individual. He did not adhere to societal norms and mostly relied on his own conscience. The main reason why he was transferred to the ward was for evaluation. Throughout the movie his mental status was yet to be declared so it could only be guessed by reviewing his actions.
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Once the vote begun, he noticed that his group was reluctant to support him because they feared to go against Nurse Ratched. The therapy sessions were major eye-openers for McMurphy. It was during another session, he discovered that he was a fully committed patient and others in his group were voluntary. He realized that Nurse Ratched was capable of keeping him in the institution, which lead to his numerous battles with the nurse. McMurphy felt the only way he was going to have a normal life again was to escape which backfired. I do not think Nurse Ratched was a bad person; I just feel it was her job and she was undeniably good at it. Yes, she could have been nicer, but she had a major role in the institution and she had to enforce

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