Gentrification And Social Mixing: Towards An Inclusive Urban Renaissance

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Gentrification is described as the process of renovation and revival of deteriorated urban neighborhoods by means of influx of more affluent residents, which results in increased property values and the displacing of lower income families and small businesses, according to google. This term is usually seen as negative, but there are arguments for positive gentrification. In my personal experience, I have only read and seen negative things about gentrification because it supposedly displaces the poor and brings in the rich people, creating segregation between classes. But does it always? There are many arguments that this idea is a myth and that gentrification is actually making urban life more inclusive and creating sustainable communities. …show more content…
When gentrification does happen, it can be seen as a possible solution to concentrations of poverty. It replaces existing high density social housing with new lower-density, mixed-income housing, in reference to Loretta Lees who questions if gentrification is a positive or negative thing in her paper titled “Gentrification and Social Mixing: Towards an Inclusive Urban Renaissance.” Many researchers believe that gentrification is not the problem of displacing people and rent going up, but that the changing economy and housing market is the problem. But since gentrification usually occurs in big cities where the poverty rates are much higher, it is then shown mostly in the news and media where many people hear about it and then accept it as true for everywhere and every time it happens. John Buntin says that gentrification is actually very rare, it is just a common term that is used so people agree to take it as the norm. His opinion is that the socio-economic status of most neighborhoods is actually stable over time. He states that “economists found no evidence that poor people moved out of gentrifying neighborhoods at a higher rate than normal.” People move for many reasons other than gentrification, and more researchers should look at the other factors as well because not all gentrification is …show more content…
Mueller argues that if you live in a city, then you’re definitely caught up in the issue. The cities that have seen and are still seeing gentrification the most are Chicago, New York, San Francisco, Boston, Washington D.C. and Seattle. The pattern between these cities are that they all have large populations with a diverse amount of incomes and also a large portion of poor people living in them. In the end, gentrification is about redevelopment, renewal, regeneration, revitalization and reinvestment and it is not always negative, but it is also not always

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