Naypyidaw Case Study

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On Sunday November 6, 2005, the Myanmese military government officially relocated the national capital from Yangon to Naypyidaw in a rural mountainous valley in southern Mandalay Division. The next day, Myanmar’s Information Minister, General Kyaw Hasan announced that the country’s capital would be a newly established city in Pyinmana District. On March 2, 2006, the new administrative capital in Kyatpyae Village of Pyinmana District was publicly named “Naypyidaw (Nay Pyi Daw). Capital city often move, as in the case of Myanmar’s generals uprooting the country’s administrative center from Yangon to Naypyidaw. This specific case of Myanmar however was quite rational and with surprisingly practical reasons. While many of the motivations ascribed …show more content…
Modern strategic thread was often used by the militia controlled governance as a contributed reason for the sudden relocation of the capital and the example of King Mindon’s decision to relocate the capital from Amarapura to Madalay in the Shan State in 1857 as in the case of the British Empire colonization of lower and outer Myanmar was often used as an example. But who exactly is the threat? What foreign powers has colonized any part of modern-day …show more content…
In fact, Naypyidaw has a good chance to become a spiritual center. The view of pagodas from office windows set to inspire bureaucrats to fulfill their duties to the state. Spiritual and cultural purification has become a political project of the ruling regime that is intrinsically tied with the quest for cultural unity and national security. As foretold by an old Buddhist prophecy which foretells that the most powerful king will leave the old capital and construct a new one. Moving the capital, which is often a symbol of historical pride and cultural heritage was an important manifestation of the policy of escaping from the volatile outside world and preserving their own cultural identity. Even the Khmer Rouge, former rulers of today’s Cambodia from 1975 to 1989, who nearly succeeded in ridding the state in its entirely of its monastic institutions and religious heritage, maintained the 12th century Angkor Wat prominently as the center of the country’s

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