Nationalization Of Illegal Immigration

1784 Words 8 Pages
My fight for immigration reform began in the sixth grade with the arrival of my best friend Judith and her family from Mexico. They have exposed me to a new, hardworking culture that does not get its due credit from media and politicians. The injustice these remarkable people face not only sparked a fire in myself but my entire family. My Father Dan Aldridge, a lawyer licensed to practice in both Alabama and Tennessee, would soon become well acquainted with a good friend of Judith’s family. Juan, who is a husband, a father to two children, and is an illegal immigrant. One night, he was arrested for a DUI while in his neighborhood and Aldridge took on his case. In the case of a DUI, the intoxicated person has to be witnessed actually driving …show more content…
As previously mentioned, there are 11.3 million illegal aliens living in the U.S. The undocumented immigrants are more valuable as citizens than they are being deported. Philip Wolgin argues that if the United States were to give these illegal residents a path to citizenship, the tax influx “would add a cumulative $1.2 trillion to the GDP over a decade.” Not only will the tax influx put a dent into the national debt but it will happen in a fairly quick amount of time. Theoretically, the gains that are shown will only increase overtime. With the mark of citizenship, the once illegal aliens will have opportunities to get higher paying jobs. The increased income will mean higher income taxes and higher revenue. If these people were to be deported in their entirety, the government would miss the opportunity to have major financial gain. There is also no data proving that if the U.S. legalizes these immigrants there will be a mandatory boost on funding for health services or defense services (Ferguson). The government will not have to compensate for the influx in population. Making illegal immigrants citizens will raise their wages and they will put more back into the economy and now without fear, thus helping fund jobs and the economy. The undocumented immigrant population is a crucial asset to working toward a surplus in the national …show more content…
One argument against nationalization explores the effect of mass immigration on America’s natural resources. Wooldridge points out “the long-term ramifications facing their progeny as water, energy, and resources exhaust themselves from sheer over-use and over-extension.” Nonrenewable resources are a pressing concern facing our future generations and the race for green alternatives shows an impressive drive for constructive developments. The solution to these problems could be hidden in the mind of an illegal immigrant that does not have access to the education. When they go through the proposed fast-track to legalization, their new validation will lead to personal motivation. Becoming knowledgeable about current issues the United States is facing should be a part of becoming a U.S citizen. The new citizens will utilize this knowledge and powerful motivation to make changes. There is also the argument of what would be a chain reaction following amnesty or an advanced legalization process. Kirsanow, an attorney, claims that the immigration bill proposed by president Obama “is structured to attract low-skilled immigrants and spur illegal immigration.” Both amnesty and the expedited legalization process would spark more immigrants to illegally enter the states to take advantage of this opportunity. If this were to happen, they would not stay illegal immigrants for long. The

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