Mormonism, Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses, And Puritans

1319 Words 5 Pages
Everyone has their own views and theories about the world around them. It hard for one type of group to fulfill everyone needs. Throughout this course, I was exposed to materials that discussed the magnitude of religion, the impact it had on society, and the multiple groups that were formed from other groups. Yet in all of these information that was presented in the book, there was one dominate theme that protruded out. The fact of the matter is people were easily influenced to join religious groups, especially the ones that had very strict rules to follow and limited a person freedom. Three religious in particularly showcased these traits, Mormons, Jehovah Witnesses, and Puritans. During the nineteen century, the American people witnessed …show more content…
Due the constant jobs and moving the Smiths were not particularly involved in any religious organizations (Butler, Wacker, Balmer, 2011). Confused and out of answers Joseph prayed to God. On his15th birthday. Smith asked God’s help in picking a church that we would join. God told him that he did not fit in a church, so for the next several years Smith had a vision, until Moroni, an angel that only Joseph could see, told him about the “golden tablets hidden beneath a stone on a nearby hillside, which held the wisdom he was seeking” (Butler, Wacker, Balmer, 2011). It took three years to translate the scripters then in March 1830, the Book of Mormon was published. The Bible told the story of ancient Hebrew people and their travels to the New World and the conflicts that followed (Butler, Wacker, Balmer, 2011). The story was creative, but did not have historical facts to support his argument, but somehow people were intrigued with the new ideology and followed Smith teaching (Butler, Wacker, Balmer, 2011). Mormons used multiple forms of outside writing and incorporated that into the Bible and believed that God would choose anyone to receive his revelations (Butler, Wacker, Balmer, 2011). Due to the radical notions that …show more content…
Charles Taze Russell introduced people to a new type of religion because of the increase in the idea that God was physically returning to Earth (Butler, Wacker, & Balmer, 20l1). After the Civil War one of the main conclusion people had was how to deal with the intellectual, social, and technological advancements of modern world (Butler, Wacker, & Balmer, 20l1). Crowds of people voiced their option on the situation. Some groups wanted to convert back to the conservative methods and only listen to the Bible. Others, integrated concepts from the modern world in the Bible. While the rest of world thought that they should prepare themselves for the arrival of the Lord. Charles Russell looked to the Old Testament to help organize this newly formed group. Russell did not acknowledge Christians teaching about sinners going to hell or the fact hell exist (Butler, Wacker, & Balmer, 20l1). Just like Mormons Russell rejected the notion of the importance of the Trinity, and taught a different approach to the Bible. Russell positively convinced that God, or Jehovah as known in the Old Testament, was the only higher power authority. In addition, Russell undoubtedly knew that Christ “had returned to earth in spirit” (Butler, Wacker, & Balmer, 20l1). Christ appearance to Earth was for the sole purpose that God and the Holy Angels “would lunch a terrible war upon Satan and his

Related Documents