Roger Williams Environmental Racism And Black Theology

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History of United States is full of ups and downs. So many good things happened that improved the future of of the whole nation, but we cannot forget about the dark side. Wars, gender inequality, and racial discrimination make up the majority of negative aspects. People who are oppressed, abused, and minority look for escapes from their misery. One of those last resorts is religion.
Since I am an immigrant who became a citizen, I would use this research paper as an opportunity to look back at the history and learn valuable lessons about resilience and strength. In order for me to keep moving with my point, I have to define black theology. Essay “Environmental Racism and Black Theology: James H. Cone Instructs Us on Whiteness,” by Marguerite
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Just like God set Israel free from Egyptian oppression, He was trying to fight oppression of blacks in the Unites States in the 20th century. Black Church played a crucial role in the development of Theology. Since it was part of social life, knowledge from Bible easily spread among African American communities. Black theology addressed many issues of black communities. Some of them were inequality, human rights, racism, but the most important issue was oppression. According to “A Black Pastor Looks at Black Theology,” by Roger Williams, black theology allows to go free if one is under limitations of their rights and abuse. In 1960s, religious beliefs became a tool that bounded people and gave them the strength to resist oppression and gain equal civil rights. As it was mentioned above, movement faded, so as a bond and beliefs of people. Theology has its significant figures, now and in the past. The most prominent figures in black theology are Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King, Jr., and James Cone. To begin with, I would like to talk about Marcus Garvey. He was one of the first people who started talking about religion from a perspective of an African American according to Rhodes’ article. Garvey guided his people and used religion as a framework to give them a feeling of …show more content…
So far from conducted research, I can see that black theology was able to unite people across the United States. It is undeniable advantage that allowed African Americans gain their rights in 1960s. If there are pros, there are cons as well. According to one of the resources, back theology implies that God is black and Cone tries to justify it by saying that God is taking qualities of the ones who are oppressed. This assumption creates tension and segregation. God does not belong to one or the other group of people because He is God. We are supposed to think of God without limitations of race or gender. Also there is a danger in using love in black theology because love includes interests of everyone. Cone talks about how “righteousness” will only include the interests of one specific group, African Americans. God is love and He gives it all to us, no matter what skin color one

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