How Did The Second Great Awakening Influence Individualism

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Second Great Awakening

The Second Great Awakening promoted the idea of individualism and choosing a path to follow and a future to pursue. One aspect that shaped the Second Great Awakening was the idea of revivals and if someone does not find God during their time on earth they will be sent to eternal damnation. Revivals were one way to break away from their sins and start again.
One powerful preacher who held several day long revivals was Charles G. Finney. Finney was one of the most influential revivalists and pushed people to choose God and turn away their sins and work to make their planet and life better. Finney believed that once someone forgets their sins and bad deeds they can start doing God’s work. Finney’s revivals included having women pray out loud in public meetings of various genders, development of the "anxious seat", which was a place where people considering becoming Christians could sit to receive prayer and public censure of individuals by name in sermons and prayers. (City Vision University).
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Smith said God told him where to find gold tablets in the forest and only he could decipher them. Smith believed all other religious sects had lost their way and he was suppose to help guide them. Latter Day Saints focused on direct revivals and this movement often led to violence.
Timothy Dwight IV helped begin the Second Great Awakening. Dwight was the president of Yale College and felt like it was his obligation to stop the spread of sacrilegious ideas, he supported religious revivals and brought them to Yale. He abolished half-way covenant in many churches throughout New England. Dwight wanted a restoration of a "less compromised"

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